Blended Learning with Littles

A blended learning environment is one in which technology and “offline” teaching are seamlessly intertwined throughout the day. Blended learning environments allow for student agency, passions, and mastery to grow.

21st Century Learning

In the 21st Century Framework, students use digital tools, collaboration, communication, creativity, critical thinking (The 4 Cs), and other career readiness skills to curriculum standards. In the 21st Century Framework, teachers design lessons, and experiences that pull in multiple skills listed above. Teachers must model risk-taking and perseverance. Teachers must also look for ways to include a global perspective in their curriculum. A blended learning environment provides teachers with tools to use to teach the skills and perspectives outlined by the 21st Century Framework. In a blended learning environment, students can use devices to share their learning with the world through Twitter, Instagram, a Seesaw blog, or other tools. Students can complete work in a way that makes sense to them. They can use a digital tool like Seesaw, Flipgrid, or Google Classroom to collaborate and communicate with one another. They can use their creativity to respond to assignments or teacher prompts using tools like pic collage, Seesaw, Chatterpix, and more. Students can apply critical thinking by considering their digital footprint prior to sharing with the world, solving problems with a team, or deciding which digital tool works best for them when given a choice.img_0862default

The 4Cs

Blending technology into your lessons allows for opportunities for students to experience the 4Cs. Blended learning can consist of student choices in response to learning. Students need to think Critically (1) about the task at hand and the best way to Communicate (2) their learning with others. I have given students choices for Letterland phonics sorts to use either Seesaw or paper and pencil. My kindergarteners figured out which way worked best for them and stuck with that method. In my kindergarten and first grade classrooms, we use #BookSnaps to reflect on text reading. Students have a choice in how they respond to that text and are very Creative (3) in their text annotating using labels, drawing, and emojis to annotate the text. I encourage students to Collaborate (4) and work together on one device. You know the saying 2 heads are better than one. Well, it still holds true when kids are creating content using technology. They aren’t only sharing their learning but they are learning ways to work on a team. Because a blended learning environment encourages collaboration, we don’t need to be 1:1 with students to devices in order to have a blended environment. There are times in my classroom where we use 1:1 and times where only 4 devices get used and the kids work together.

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Access to multiple types of devices grows flexibility

I’ve heard people say they don’t like technology in the classroom because technology changes frequently and just when you get used to something there is something new out there. I love that technology changes all the time. It forces us to be flexible, a super important executive functioning skill. In my classroom (not by choice) I have 2 desktop computers, one laptop, 5 iPad 2s, 1 newer iPad, my teacher laptop, my old iPhone 6, and 2 of my personal devices I let kids use occasionally (a chromebook and an iPhone 8 plus), and because of BYOD we have various models of iPads and iPand minis. Soon, we are getting new chromebooks from the district. The variety of devices that my students have access too requires them to transfer skills to different types of operating systems and to problem solve when something doesn’t work. I have kids who prefer the desktop computers for one task, an iPad for another, and my old phone for another. We have that flexibility for them to find what works best for them.

Learning first Technology Second

It is important to remember that the learning always needs to come first. Technology should support the learning. It never comes first in my planning process. I start by looking at my standards and unpacking what that means for students. My next step is to decide how we will approach the standard and how it should break down for student learning. Sometimes technology fits in and amplifies the learning, other times it doesn’t. Sometimes my devices sit without being touched all day and sometimes we use them in every block. Sometimes I don’t plan for technology but my students find a way to amplify their own learning and voices during a lesson or learning experience using technology and clearly I have to allow it! Like I said at the top, a blended learning environment includes both technology AND “offline” learning. It is important to know your standards, know your kids, and plan appropriately.

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Making Family Connections – mulitple methods

In early education, it is important to make connections and build relationships early. It’s obvious to any teacher that we should be doing this in our classrooms with our students but we also need to make these connections and relationships with our students’ families. This is an area where I am still growing.

This isn’t always easy. Some caregivers didn’t have strong or positive school experiences and tend to shy away from involvement opportunities. Some families don’t have access to transportation and need other access points into the school world. Some families may not be “traditional” and may not feel included in school life. I recently discussed this topic with my PLN in the #NCSnowChat

The general consensus was that we should use inclusive language, ask questions, and listen to understand. During this conversation, a few different methods for making those family connections came up frequently. The rest of this blog post will explore my thoughts on using different “tools” for making connections with families. Please chime in with your ideas and opinions in the comments below!

Seesaw/Dojo/Remind (fill in the blank tech tool)

I love Love LOVE Seesaw! It is my go-to for student choice. I love connecting with families on Seesaw and my students enjoy interacting with their families in real time. This year, Seesaw changed from a parent app to a family app and this subtle shift in name, with more inclusive language, makes their product more accessible to more families. Now, 10 family members can connect to a student’s journal and interact digitally. I encourage families to leave comments on their student’s work. The best comments are questions that students need to respond to. I partnered with Caitlin McCommons to give a Seesaw training to parents at our school. One of the resources we shared was a comment list. This gives parents ideas for leaving feedback to their student that helps continue the learning.

That being said, I think teachers need to be careful relying on these tools as a method of communication. I say this as a teacher who used Remind to communicate with families on a daily basis! Using technology tools creates stronger connections with SOME families but is not always accessible to ALL families. Think about it, does every family have a computer (no), does every family have a smartphone (most likely), does every family have internet access (no), does every family have data cell plans (no). You can argue that they can go to the library or so many places have free wifi. Go for it. BUT, would YOU go to the library or to a free public wifi location every time YOU wanted to get online for something? If you did would an app like these be your top priority or would you be paying your bills? I challenge relying on these tech tools for family connections. It is one way but should not be your only way.

Email

I communicate through email like 90% of the time and I know that not all my families have regular access to email, not all families read the emails I sent and might prefer a different method of communication. I choose email because it is convenient and comfortable for me. I’ve come to this realization:

IT’S NOT ABOUT ME!

And I need to change the way I do things to make better connections with students and families. I’m working on building relationships with better face to face interactions and more phone calls

Phone Calls

Real talk – I hate talking on the phone. I don’t like talking on the phone to my own friends and family much less calling the families of my students! I know there are people out there who like it and can spend hours on the phone but I just get … bored? awkward? I would rather type something through a text, email, or social media or hang out with someone face to face than talk on the phone. I took a step outside my comfort zone and called all of my families two weeks ago. It took a lot out of me. However, the families really appreciated it! I didn’t even call for a specific reason. I just called to check in. The conversations I had ranged from questions about lunch to assessments, something their child said that confused them to their last/upcoming family trip, new dance classes to current class size legislation. I have to say, as much as I dislike talking on the phone, I enjoyed these conversations and I feel like I built relationships. I’m going to continue these types check-in calls every 3-4 weeks. (If you’re reading this, ask me about it to keep me accountable ok?)

Face to Face

To me, these are the best connections. I enjoy spending time with people. I think that tone of voice, facial expression, and gestures help people communicate. I like parent-teacher conferences. I like to sit down and talk, share work, and celebrate growth with families. I have done traditional parent-teacher conferences and student-led conferences in the past. (How I run student-led conferences is another post for another day.) I like both methods for littles. Sometimes it’s not appropriate to have a student or other families present for a conversation. And, I don’t like to rely on one method. This year I’m going to try goal setting conferences (coming up in the next few weeks) with families before our student-led conferences. I’ll keep you posted on how that goes. I also try to be flexible with my conference times. I know that families have different routines and need options. Ideally, I like to offer morning, during the day, and evening time slots. Some families can’t leave work early for a conference and need other options. I pick 1 evening where I stay at school late to accommodate them. This year, I’m going to offer some weekend time slots as well.

In the Community

Making connections with families in the community can be fun! I used to avoid running into families at the grocery store or Target. But now that I don’t live in my school community, these chance encounters are special. It is so fun to see a family out in the world interacting and the students are always surprised to see their teacher, not at school. They treat you like a celebrity! Our school PTA plans family nights out to local businesses as fundraisers or to support our sponsors. I love going to these events to see current and former families. The conversations are so natural and not just about school life and academics. I feel like I create genuine connections. This year, with my team, we planned a weekend outing to the arcade. We planned to be there during a certain time and invited families to come and play with us. We used it to launch our arcade building PBL for our force and motion science standard (Sci1P1). It was so much fun to play games with my kids and have meaningful conversations using vocabulary we were using at school while making a real-world connection to the content we were learning. I enjoyed this so much, I would like to plan other community outings for my families!

I have in the past and will continue to use a combination of all of these methods and tools for family connections because developing a strong, collaborative relationship with my students and their families is important to me.

After starting this blog post and outlining it, I participated in a #SlowFlipChat with Jessica Twomey and Christine Pinto in the #InnovatingPlay and #GAfE4Littles community using Flipgrid as a tool for communication. The topic was *drum roll please*

Making Connections!

And that chat inspired me to finish writing this post. You should totally go check it out. I’ll make it easy for you, click here.

Seesaw! My go to for student choice

What is Seesaw

Seesaw is a digital portfolio platform that can be scaled for students pre-k-12. It is simple and intuitive for littles but also provides opportunities for critical thinking, communication, and feedback that can reach students through 12th grade. Seesaw allows students to post to their journal and a class feed with photo, video, text, drawing, or google doc integration responses. Students can scroll through the class feed and like or comment on their peer’s responses. Student responses can be organized in folders for easy searchability. Parents can connect to their child’s Seesaw journal and like and comment their work as well as see progress over time.

Why I Seesaw

I seesaw because it provides students with opportunities to express themselves through multiple methods. I love the choices it provides students as they share their learning and reflections. I love that kids can practice citizenship by commenting on each other’s posts. Seesaw is like social media for kids. It is a great way to model appropriate digital behavior and moderate as they practice.

How I Seesaw

For the last 3 years that I have used Seesaw, my students have quickly become Seesaw experts. They are able to post to their journal quickly and independently. I use Seesaw for a variety of things. The list below includes things my students have posted (both kindergarten and first grade):

  • Math Story Problems
      • Students need to be able to create their own story problems in order to fully understand how they work. Writing their own helps them play with the language used in a story problem and therefore provides them access to better understanding story problems that need solving. After posting a story problem, students then scroll through the feed to solve others’ story problems. They have learned to write better problems that require multiple steps and make sure to include a question at the end and not the answer! This has been one of my math stations for the last 2 years and they LOVE it! I change out the manipulatives for them occasionally to keep things fun and interesting! (#math1OA2)

    https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=embed

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a43f96cc-65f3-482c-b175-361d04a19641&share_token=6XyASDNIRAGDSxX36yJHwA&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.ded27a4f-dcb4-4f67-b671-ced42b19c3c0&share_token=FSelo5GOTWSLmfdIY_fF6Q&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.62d78ca1-2eea-45bb-9717-22da9d82b64d&share_token=ycae-zyARtu7maMObWaQ9w&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.d9c52808-a4cc-4ed8-b867-ca8aa6736bb2&share_token=cjhglUSHSY-vTjCAaRcWWw&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.08e03b4e-6b56-4ec7-a594-42be62810f4a&share_token=kNoufDy0Qumkv0s1AzPqOw&mode=share

  • Relationship building
    • Students also share photos on Seesaw at home. I love getting notifications on the weekend of baby brothers and sisters, road trips, a book they’re reading, and songs they made up. I even had a student upload a video to Seesaw in the car as they were moving to another state!

I would love for you to share in the comments why you Seesaw or your favorite things for students to upload on their student Journals!

Not included in this post: encouraging positive interactions through likes and comments and family involvement! Those are blog posts for a different time!

I didn’t even know, but I was doing #booksnaps

I’ve been doing this really cool thing for over 2 years and had no idea it was a thing until last year! Ever since I started using Seesaw in my classroom, I’ve had students posting about the books they read. It started with a picture of the cover of the book and recording as they read or taking a video of their reading. This task helped build fluency and understanding (RL.K.10).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a586b168-28cc-46cb-b579-d0d549f6f1ee&share_token=WR6lMaK_RhSXgJbfpTUuZg&mode=embed
Then we moved to a photo of the cover and retelling the story (RL.K.2). Eventually we began taking photos of the pages of the book and explaining how the picture supports the text (RL.K.7). And then it happened. I asked the students to identify the “expert words” in an informational book and one of my students used the label tool and labeled the expert words in the picture and then recorded to explain them (RI.K.4).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.279af4b0-89a6-496b-bba9-7b326ff0127a&share_token=mAWp-IWLTqCdc7Bf_d-ogA&mode=embed

This changed everything! I realized how much more I know about his understanding of the text and that he is applying the minilessons to his independent practice. Annotating the picture gave me way more information than simply having students record to tell. This in-the-moment decision this little friend made changed everything for me! I realized that I needed to be doing more book responses this way. I began encouraging students to post their responses with labels and using the drawing tool to explain their thinking.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.2d754895-473c-4ea3-8e50-562be180b87a&share_token=xOH0efHSRceJJctycZOWdw&mode=embed
And then I wend to my first edcamp, edcamp wake March, 18 2017. I went to a session on booksnaps because I had seen the idea floating around twitter and wasn’t quite sure what it was. Turns out this was one of the edcamp sessions where everyone turned up to learn something and no one really knew what it was or how to do it. After some on the spot collaborative research we were able to figure out that booksnaps were a way for students to share a reaction or their thinking on a specific section of a book using snapchat. And a light bulb went on in my head: “I do that! I just didn’t know it was a thing!” So I shared some of my students work and how we use Seesaw as a tool to share about the books we read. From this session I decided to be more intentional about students’ booksnaps and having them cite their source. I noticed that by the end of the school year, the more I asked them to include, the quality of showing what they know decreased.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.92c28d55-89b0-4efe-8ffc-36dd1c134c5b&share_token=_jHL1-SqR4qGayV8BB-hqQ&mode=embed

This year, I was more intentional about introducing booksnaps to my students and created an anchor chart to make sure all the parts were included.

This year, our booksnaps have been a much higher quality including, labels, drawing, emojis, captions, and voice recordings. I have added to this chart since this picture to include retell, character strengths, comparing and contrasting, and tell 3 things. I will continue to add to this chart all year as we focus our booksnaps on different standards and question types.

Main idea (RI.1.2)

 https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.97c37c36-f4f1-4a4f-8908-97408402ecea&share_token=28dEW_iNTKKZXzPLciZ6xQ&mode=embed

Reaction (RL.1.7)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.c8ec8582-2f7f-485b-a9f8-2c542142c0c9&share_token=oaflFyR5SKitPxgaQoI1kw&mode=embed

Compare and contrast characters (RL.1.9)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.61e71d97-8466-4999-b4d9-3d77b35b83f5&share_token=eDZUfHKxR7m9EWw84TJPaA&mode=embed

Tell 3 things (RI.1.8)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.740635e6-db52-4571-9048-7440f8630722&share_token=1TXS8ZMASwuORlh1nOAcSw&mode=embed

Our next step with booksnaps is to explore different technology tools to use. We will try some with flipgrid and chatterpix next.

What is your favorite tool for booksnaps? How do you make booksnaps accessible to your littles?

#Eclipse2017

Anyone out there still working on their plan for The Great American Eclipse? In my area we have the opportunity to see about 90% of the total eclipse and I am TOTALLY nerding out! North Carolina just rolled out a new science standard for first grade 1.E.1 – Recognize the features and patterns of the earth/moon/sun system as observed from earth. This means #Eclipse2017 fits in my standards!!!! I’m just now getting my details worked out and thought I would share them. Please share yours in the comments section!

Wonder

One of my goals this year is inquiry based instruction. I’m going to begin our day by collecting questions my firsties have about the eclipse. I’m sure they have heard people talking about it and I want to gather what they know and wonders. This may require some last minute scrambling to make sure I address misconceptions and questions I’m not prepared for.

Video

Discovery Education has gathered some great video and image  resources for the eclipse. I’ll start with the one titled “Solar Eclipse.” We’ll watch it once and then I’ll have my firsties write one thing they learned on a sheet of paper. We will use the DE Spotlight on Strategy (SOS) Snowball Fight to review our learning from the video. Students will crumple their paper into a ball, throw it in the middle of the circle and on my cue pull one sheet of paper out and read it. We’ll then watch the video again. After a second video, students will pull 2 snowballs from the circle and add an idea from the video to their friends’ snowballs. We’ll then have some share time to discuss what we noticed from the video. You will probably be able to find a few good videos on You Tube if you don’t have access to Discovery Education.

Article

Reading A-Z has some great science content on Science A-Z. Their July issue has a short 1 page article I’m going to have my firsties read in pairs. After reading, they will use Flipgrid to share a selfie video of the most interesting thing from the article. If you don’t have access to this great resource, they offer a free 2 week trial! Also, Front Row is free and they have a few different short, leveled articles about the eclipse you can share.

Model the eclipse

I have a handful of flashlights and quarters I’m bringing to school tomorrow. Students will use these materials to work in groups of 3-4 to make a video of what they think will happen during the eclipse. They will post this video on Seesaw.

Eclipse Observation

I have this amazing observation sheet from my EDU buddy Bill Ferriter. I have made 5 copies for each student. We will go outside to observe for about 30 seconds. Then we will come inside to work on our observation sheets. We will go out for observation 5 different times during the eclipse so my firsties can see the changes in the sky and environment. Each time we come inside to reflect on observations, we will discuss what we saw and make a prediction of what it will look like next. I’ll have a student share their drawing  and together we will draw our predictions on a portable dry erase board.

Extras!

I just bought a Google Cardboard and they have a Virtual Reality App for the eclipse. It costs $0.99 but I think that is worth it! I only have 1 cardboard so they will have to take turns. I’m doing this before the eclipse will help curb their desire to look at the eclipse outside.


Discovery Education also has a bunch of other videos I can use for my firsties to gather more information. They are also streaming the eclipse live on the Science Channel if it is cloudy or something happens that we can’t go outside. We can also view this when the eclipse is over as we reflect on the experience.

If we have time, we will make this to help us act out the movements of the earth and moon around the sun and try to make it show a solar eclipse.

Mystery Science also has a great activity with all the content you will need!

Reflect

I’m going to use another DE SOS for students to reflect on their experience. I’ll have them recreate the eclipse with art materials then tell about it with the “3 truths and a lie” SOS. I’m going to have them start with 1 truth and 1 lie and add to it time permitting. We’ll write the truths and lies flipbook style so we can hang them in the hall and others can guess which is the truth and which is the lie and flip it up to see.

I also have other reflection ideas so this may change or, better yet, I’ll give them a choice. It’ll depend on how everything goes tomorrow.

  • SOS 6 Word Story
  • Another FlipGrid
  • Chatterpix
  • Seesaw

Note: It is NEVER safe to look directly at the sun! I have parent permission and NASA approved eclipse glasses for each of my firsties. We are going outside to view the eclipse. I will (obviously) be very strict about making sure they know the damage that can be done if they do not leave their glasses on their eyes. I’ve done my research and know that if they look with a naked eye they won’t feel pain because the retina doesn’t have pain receptors and they will have blurry or even lose their vision permanently. I’m going to be very up front and honest with my firsties and I trust them to follow my directions.

PS – I’ll take pictures tomorrow and edit this post after!

5 Lessons Learned from BYOD with Littles

3 years ago my principal, Dr. Sandy Chambers challenged our staff to participate in a district pilot program in which students would bring devices to school from home (Bring Your Own Device – BYOD). This included a lot of push back, a lot of challenges, and a lot of awesomeness! I’m not gonna lie – I didn’t think it would work in kindergarten! They couldn’t keep track of their jacket! How would they keep track of a device!? It took a few years but I think I have learned some lessons that might help others get going on BYOD with littles!

Lesson #1

Set Expectations 

My school has a contract for each family participating in BYOD. If students don’t follow the guidelines they can lose the privilege of BYOD.  You will need to teach, model, and repeat these expectations with both parents and students frequently. Expectations include:

  • Use the device for learning.
  • Carry it with 2 hands.
  • Only the owner can use it.
  • Devices come to school charged.
  • How often the kid should bring their device.
  • Apps or settings kids need.
  • Digital Citizenship

Lesson #2

Procedures, Procedures, Procedures!

Procedures are what keeps your classroom running smoothly. Teachers have procedures for everything from going to the bathroom to solving student disagreements. BYOD needs its own set of specific procedures. You will need to teach, model, and repeat these procedures frequently. My procedures include:

  • Sign in devices daily so you know what is in your classroom. The sign in let’s me know what I have available each day.
  • Our devices are to stay in student bookbags until we need them.
  • I have a call out to check what students are doing. When I say, “device check!” Students immediately hold their device above their head facing in my direction. If they take a long time or you can see them tapping their devices they are most likely off task.
  • When instructing or giving directions I ask kids to put their devices in “listening mode.” This means they are upside down on their lap.
  • Kindness matters! When responding to other’s work digitally, be kind.

Lesson #3

Allow for students to become experts!

Pick a few apps you want students to have on their BYOD and use them frequently! Let the kids become experts. These apps should become second nature and a “go to” for responses and reflection. Try to pick open ended apps that can be used for creation. Here’s a list of my favorites:

  • Seesaw
  • Chatterpix,
  • Do ink green screen,
  • Felt board

I use and teach other apps too but these are the ones we use the most. I also use raz-kids/kids a-z daily, but it isn’t a creation app.

I also like to keep a running list of things I want to try. Here is my list of creative apps I want to try:

  • aurasma
  • book creator
  • sock puppet
  • coma coma

Lesson #4

Create!

Devices can add to your lessons in meaningful ways. A true blended classroom integrates technology seamlessly. Think creation and not just playing on apps. Use apps that are open ended and allow students to create: draw, photo, video, and write. Playing games and doing rote practice is not a sustainable way to integrate technology. Creation can be used for students to share their learning, respond to questions, or reflect on their learning. Allow students choice in how they share, respond, and reflect. Remember those favorite apps… They are all choices! Students choose them for different reasons depending on what they are trying to communicate.

Lesson #5

Try!

You will find things that work and things that don’t. Be flexible and take a chance. You’ll be surprised what littles can do with devices, they are digital natives after all! Modeling and involving them in the problem solving process is key to success in BYOD for littles.

Please reach out to me if you have any questions about BYOD and littles!

My Knowledge of Content Knowledge

Here I sit on an airplane on my way home for the holidays and all I can do is reflect on my teaching. It’s the end of December the universal time for reflection. It’s hard not to end the year and prepare for the next and not reflect on life in general. My professional resolution this year is momentum. I want to continue the momentum from #wonderwake and all that I learned and challenged myself to begin. I’m ending 2016 with a blog post and I’ll begin 2017 with another. 

This post was meant to be me reflecting on Standard 3 of the NC teacher evaluation standards. But, as I started to type it turned into my talking about a math lesson I taught in the hallway the last day before winter break and a track out. However I think this lesson I ramble about is a great example of how I meet this teaching standard. 

I started out on my plan to dissect standards :

Standard 3 -Teachers know the content they teach – align to standard course of study, content appropriate to teaching specialty, recognize interconnectedness of content areas, make instruction relevant 

My curriculum is based on the North Carolina Standard accursed of Study based on the Common Core State Standards. I am tasked with teaching 5 year olds to read and write, to understand how numbers work, basic science concepts (animals, weather, and properties), basic social studies concepts (citizenship, economics, cultural similarities and differences, and maps). I love that the standards I teach were written vertically. You can choose any strand and follow it all the way up through high school. I think this is so important for the students. It gives a purpose for every small piece I teach. Everything builds on the grades before and challenges students to learn more and think deeper. 

Here’s what I’ve learned about my curriculum- basic is not basic at all! Teaching a child to read and write in 9 short months is nothing short of a miracle! There are times I’m not even sure how it happened! Students in kindergarten come in with the widest range of background knowledge than any other grade level! (Here’s where the ramble begins) For example- my current unit in math is geometry. Yes geometry in kindergarten! We learn 2 D shapes, 3D shapes, Positional words, comparing and building shapes. I have students who have not had any experience with any shapes and others who know basic shapes (circle, square, triangle…), and others who know it all already! Here are 2 of my students explaining. How they are exploring shapes. My friend in green took the lead. My friend in red is a little embarrassed to be on camera! 😄


My job is to take what they know and teach them what they need to know. If they already know it I need to teach them a deeper understanding and how to use their knowledge to teach others. Tasking students with tutoring a peer who struggles is a great way to deepen their understanding. Teaching another student requires a child to think about it in a different way. 

This lesson took place in the main hall at my school. We are a year round school and on our track out days I end up with out a physical classroom and need to be creative and flexible about where and how I teach. This was a shape hunting lesson- look for shapes in your world around you. How do they make up real things? (eh hem – engineering) pretty things? (errr – art) etc. My challenge is to not only have students who don’t know shapes to find and identify them but for students who do know shapes to describe, compare, and teach them.

In the video above Green was peer tutoring Red in shapes. He learned so much from her in 10 minutes that would have taken me at least 2 small group sessions to teach him. As they hunted for shapes they took videos using Chatter Pix Kids and SeeSaw (2 of my favorite apps to smash – if you don’t know them you need to explore!) Here’s Red’s post on SeeSaw after Green helped him hunt for shapes.

What do you think? Was my lesson here relevant? Connected? Appropriate? Aligned to standards?