Reflections from #NSTA18 conference

In late November 2018, I attended my second National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conference. This year was different from last year because this was a national conference and last year was a state conference. I was fortunate enough to get accepted to co-present with Caitlin McCommons on one of the many topics we are passionate about. We ran a hands-on session for teachers to grow their Professional Learning Network (PLN) through a real-time Twitter chat. This is the second time we have led a similar session and we have gotten good feedback.

I’d like to take some time to digest and synthesize my learning from the other sessions I attended. We attended 2 sessions on integrating trade books with science instruction. My Amazon cart is stuffed with books I want to add to my collection. When integrating literature with science curriculum, it is important to remember that the science content in the book should be accurate. The books shared during science lessons don’t need to be nonfiction all the time. Stories and poems can teach science content in a relatable way. In the second session on trade books in science instruction, we talked about partnering hands-on activities with trade books. One example was reading a book like Red Eyes or Blue Feathers and then having kids play with plastic insects and fabric samples to see if they can find where an insect will camouflage best. It was surprising that not all pairings were what I initially expected. Both sessions touched on including poems with science instruction. That is something I am going to try in the unit I am currently teaching on earth materials. Here is one of the lists of science trade books from one of the sessions (slides at the top and list around page 20).

We attended another session on maximizing your time in science class by streamlining your lessons and experiments. The presenters’ idea was that if you follow the same process for every science lesson, the kids will become fluent and will be able to complete an activity or experiment efficiently. Their framework involved 2 similar experiments one with an expected outcome and one with a different outcome that would inspire a question. Students would then need to come up with a hypothesis, written in an if/then frame. And begin testing their hypothesis. I used a framework similar to this when teaching kids about rock hardness in our scratch test lesson. It went well but I’m not quite sure where I can fit it in again.

By far my favorite session was by my friend Lindsay Rice and her colleague. They presented on the importance of movement within lessons and kinesthetic learning. By adding purposeful movements to instruction, teachers can help kids build their memory of content-specific vocabulary words. Brain research supports movement rich learning because it helps to fire up the neurons and get the blood flowing. They had us up and moving the entire time. It is always such a good reminder that movement shouldn’t be a reward or a break but can increase engagement and solidify learning.

I also really enjoyed the hashtagging with a purpose session by a local colleague, Kyle Hamstra. This idea has me hook, line, and sinker. I am not a fan of teachers pay teachers because I think teachers should be sharing freely with each other (that’s a soapbox for another post). Kyle’s brian child is #Hashtag180 and idea in which teachers add curriculum standard hashtags to their social media sharing of things happening in their classroom. How awesome would it be to search a curriculum hashtag and find tweets from other teachers teaching the same standard to help plan for learning experiences? He also shared his Flipgrid project (#GridSciNC) in which teachers can post videos to share activities and ideas organized by grade and standard. If you’re reading this, I encourage you to check out that resource now and add your own ideas to help it continue to grow! http://flipgrid.com/gridscinc

The last session of the conference was one on Citizen Science. I had no idea what citizen science was until I attended this session. Citizen science is a way for kids to actually do science in their community or on school grounds in a meaningful way that can even add to research happening by real scientists. I love the idea of getting kids involved in real science rather than controlled experiments but I’m still thinking hard about how to fit this into my current curriculum standards.

Over all, this was another great conference filled with meaningful connections with science teachers from my local district to Kalamazoo! While my post here focused on the content of the sessions I attended, it is important to state that the personal connections I made with people I knew, didn’t know, or recognized from twitter was by far the best part of the conference. I can’t wait to attend another NSTA conference next year!

#NCSTAlearns #NCSTA17 #NSTA17

I just got back from the North Carolina Science Teachers Association (NCSTA) annual conference and my heart and my mind are full! The links below are to my notes from each session I attended.

I learned to code with out a computer or device. And immediately knew how to bring it back to my students. We’re going to do this exact activity with 2 digit numbers next week as we start our comparing 2 digit number unit (NBT1.3).

I’m a Harry Potter nerd so naturally I went to see a real Madam Trelawney show me the science behind magical creatures, levitation, and potions!

I shared my resources for the new to first grade science unit – Earth in the Universe (E1.1). And while at the Elementary share-a-thon, shared the table with a new friend – Lindsay Rice. We stuck together for the rest of the conference and it was so nice to wander with a familiar face!

We learned that you shouldn’t go to sessions by exhibitors. They’ll want you to buy there stuff. And their stuff is expensive!

I learned about the benefits of graffiti for vocab learning and was inspired to make visual vocabulary displays! (coming soon to my classroom!)

I connected with some other educators after day one of the conference.

I’m inspired by Lindsay to have my students cross their mid-line to improve brain function and make vocabulary fun, engaging, and artistic.

I shared my learning on PBL and technology tools that support inquiry to a group of educators. It was my first time presenting and I’m pleased with how it went, but I have a lot of room for growth! My goal for my first presentation was to get at least 1 participant to join twitter or seesaw and I got 2 for each! Whoot whoot!!

I ended the conference building hinge joints, solving a problem like an astronaut, and attempting to build a balanced mobile (fail). I have to teach that last one soon so I’m going to get some practice in!

I’m grateful for the opportunity to attend this conference and to attend some meaningful sessions. But I’m even more thankful for the connections I made with educators from Union County, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Wilmington, Durham, and the community college network. I’ve heard that the people you meet at conferences are more important than the sessions you attend. This being my first conference on my own. I’m thrilled with the connections I made. Any conferences I attend in the future (alone or in groups) I will 100% form bonds with educators I don’t know!

Thanks to everyone who attended #NCSTAlearns. I’ll see you next year!