Flipping for Substitutes

Flipping the classroom is a teaching practice in which a teacher videos themselves teaching and send it to students to watch at home. The idea is that teachers can lecture for students to take notes outside of class time. Students then come to class prepared with knowledge and questions. Class is then interactive and hands on because students already had direct instruction.

This may be an unpopular opinion, but I don’t think teachers should be flipping their classrooms. We can’t expect students to watch videos at home and learn from them. It is inequitable. Not all students have access to devices and internet at home, some students work, some play sports, some help out with other siblings.

A few years ago I taught a multi track first grade. In our year round schools, we run on 4 different tracks or calendars. At any time there are 3 tracks in and 1 track out. Each track is in for 9 weeks and out for 3 weeks. In my multi track class, the students tracked in and out every 3 weeks and I was an 11 month teacher and tracked out less frequently. During my track outs, I had a substitute so instruction could continue. This is the year I started videoing my teaching and leaving those videos for substitutes because I needed to teach at 2 different paces depending on the instructional day for the tracks that were in at the time. This made sub plans………. challenging.

I began doing flipped videos in math for substitutes so I could ensure the strategies my students needed would be taught correctly. The video served twofold – it taught the strategy to my students and the substitute. In my sub plans, I left directions to assist with students as they watched the video and practiced. My videos followed the same structure of my typical lessons with dry erase board practice while I modeled. At the end of my videos, I gave directions for independent practice.

This seemed to work well and I got good feedback from substitutes because the knew exactly how to help students. My students like to see my face or hear my voice even when I wasn’t with them.

Later that year, I realized I could get more bang for my buck with these videos. I started to upload them to google classroom so my students could access them at any time they needed a reminder. After a parent conference in which a parent asked for a how to on math strategies, I stared uploading them to Seesaw as well so families could see me model a strategy. Please note – though I shared the videos with families, I never required students to watch the instruction at home.

I still flip my classroom for substitutes. I’ve even started making videos for literacy instruction. This year I plan to incorporate science or social studies videos into sub plans as well. This method works best when you can plan ahead for a substitute because it can be time consuming to make the videos. I don’t flip my classroom for substitutes when I am out sick because my plans are usually a little more hurried.

Here’s one example of a video I made for a substitute:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XWHz6KIVl9XCyqo3e5NhqNwtBtLgfFXjab7LBNlKDKA/edit?usp=sharing

Do you flip your classroom? Does it work for you? I would love to hear your experiences in the comments below!

Blended Learning with Littles

A blended learning environment is one in which technology and “offline” teaching are seamlessly intertwined throughout the day. Blended learning environments allow for student agency, passions, and mastery to grow.

21st Century Learning

In the 21st Century Framework, students use digital tools, collaboration, communication, creativity, critical thinking (The 4 Cs), and other career readiness skills to curriculum standards. In the 21st Century Framework, teachers design lessons, and experiences that pull in multiple skills listed above. Teachers must model risk-taking and perseverance. Teachers must also look for ways to include a global perspective in their curriculum. A blended learning environment provides teachers with tools to use to teach the skills and perspectives outlined by the 21st Century Framework. In a blended learning environment, students can use devices to share their learning with the world through Twitter, Instagram, a Seesaw blog, or other tools. Students can complete work in a way that makes sense to them. They can use a digital tool like Seesaw, Flipgrid, or Google Classroom to collaborate and communicate with one another. They can use their creativity to respond to assignments or teacher prompts using tools like pic collage, Seesaw, Chatterpix, and more. Students can apply critical thinking by considering their digital footprint prior to sharing with the world, solving problems with a team, or deciding which digital tool works best for them when given a choice.img_0862default

The 4Cs

Blending technology into your lessons allows for opportunities for students to experience the 4Cs. Blended learning can consist of student choices in response to learning. Students need to think Critically (1) about the task at hand and the best way to Communicate (2) their learning with others. I have given students choices for Letterland phonics sorts to use either Seesaw or paper and pencil. My kindergarteners figured out which way worked best for them and stuck with that method. In my kindergarten and first grade classrooms, we use #BookSnaps to reflect on text reading. Students have a choice in how they respond to that text and are very Creative (3) in their text annotating using labels, drawing, and emojis to annotate the text. I encourage students to Collaborate (4) and work together on one device. You know the saying 2 heads are better than one. Well, it still holds true when kids are creating content using technology. They aren’t only sharing their learning but they are learning ways to work on a team. Because a blended learning environment encourages collaboration, we don’t need to be 1:1 with students to devices in order to have a blended environment. There are times in my classroom where we use 1:1 and times where only 4 devices get used and the kids work together.

img_1057

Access to multiple types of devices grows flexibility

I’ve heard people say they don’t like technology in the classroom because technology changes frequently and just when you get used to something there is something new out there. I love that technology changes all the time. It forces us to be flexible, a super important executive functioning skill. In my classroom (not by choice) I have 2 desktop computers, one laptop, 5 iPad 2s, 1 newer iPad, my teacher laptop, my old iPhone 6, and 2 of my personal devices I let kids use occasionally (a chromebook and an iPhone 8 plus), and because of BYOD we have various models of iPads and iPand minis. Soon, we are getting new chromebooks from the district. The variety of devices that my students have access too requires them to transfer skills to different types of operating systems and to problem solve when something doesn’t work. I have kids who prefer the desktop computers for one task, an iPad for another, and my old phone for another. We have that flexibility for them to find what works best for them.

Learning first Technology Second

It is important to remember that the learning always needs to come first. Technology should support the learning. It never comes first in my planning process. I start by looking at my standards and unpacking what that means for students. My next step is to decide how we will approach the standard and how it should break down for student learning. Sometimes technology fits in and amplifies the learning, other times it doesn’t. Sometimes my devices sit without being touched all day and sometimes we use them in every block. Sometimes I don’t plan for technology but my students find a way to amplify their own learning and voices during a lesson or learning experience using technology and clearly I have to allow it! Like I said at the top, a blended learning environment includes both technology AND “offline” learning. It is important to know your standards, know your kids, and plan appropriately.

img_1301.jpg