Blended Learning with Littles

A blended learning environment is one in which technology and “offline” teaching are seamlessly intertwined throughout the day. Blended learning environments allow for student agency, passions, and mastery to grow.

21st Century Learning

In the 21st Century Framework, students use digital tools, collaboration, communication, creativity, critical thinking (The 4 Cs), and other career readiness skills to curriculum standards. In the 21st Century Framework, teachers design lessons, and experiences that pull in multiple skills listed above. Teachers must model risk-taking and perseverance. Teachers must also look for ways to include a global perspective in their curriculum. A blended learning environment provides teachers with tools to use to teach the skills and perspectives outlined by the 21st Century Framework. In a blended learning environment, students can use devices to share their learning with the world through Twitter, Instagram, a Seesaw blog, or other tools. Students can complete work in a way that makes sense to them. They can use a digital tool like Seesaw, Flipgrid, or Google Classroom to collaborate and communicate with one another. They can use their creativity to respond to assignments or teacher prompts using tools like pic collage, Seesaw, Chatterpix, and more. Students can apply critical thinking by considering their digital footprint prior to sharing with the world, solving problems with a team, or deciding which digital tool works best for them when given a choice.img_0862default

The 4Cs

Blending technology into your lessons allows for opportunities for students to experience the 4Cs. Blended learning can consist of student choices in response to learning. Students need to think Critically (1) about the task at hand and the best way to Communicate (2) their learning with others. I have given students choices for Letterland phonics sorts to use either Seesaw or paper and pencil. My kindergarteners figured out which way worked best for them and stuck with that method. In my kindergarten and first grade classrooms, we use #BookSnaps to reflect on text reading. Students have a choice in how they respond to that text and are very Creative (3) in their text annotating using labels, drawing, and emojis to annotate the text. I encourage students to Collaborate (4) and work together on one device. You know the saying 2 heads are better than one. Well, it still holds true when kids are creating content using technology. They aren’t only sharing their learning but they are learning ways to work on a team. Because a blended learning environment encourages collaboration, we don’t need to be 1:1 with students to devices in order to have a blended environment. There are times in my classroom where we use 1:1 and times where only 4 devices get used and the kids work together.

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Access to multiple types of devices grows flexibility

I’ve heard people say they don’t like technology in the classroom because technology changes frequently and just when you get used to something there is something new out there. I love that technology changes all the time. It forces us to be flexible, a super important executive functioning skill. In my classroom (not by choice) I have 2 desktop computers, one laptop, 5 iPad 2s, 1 newer iPad, my teacher laptop, my old iPhone 6, and 2 of my personal devices I let kids use occasionally (a chromebook and an iPhone 8 plus), and because of BYOD we have various models of iPads and iPand minis. Soon, we are getting new chromebooks from the district. The variety of devices that my students have access too requires them to transfer skills to different types of operating systems and to problem solve when something doesn’t work. I have kids who prefer the desktop computers for one task, an iPad for another, and my old phone for another. We have that flexibility for them to find what works best for them.

Learning first Technology Second

It is important to remember that the learning always needs to come first. Technology should support the learning. It never comes first in my planning process. I start by looking at my standards and unpacking what that means for students. My next step is to decide how we will approach the standard and how it should break down for student learning. Sometimes technology fits in and amplifies the learning, other times it doesn’t. Sometimes my devices sit without being touched all day and sometimes we use them in every block. Sometimes I don’t plan for technology but my students find a way to amplify their own learning and voices during a lesson or learning experience using technology and clearly I have to allow it! Like I said at the top, a blended learning environment includes both technology AND “offline” learning. It is important to know your standards, know your kids, and plan appropriately.

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I Have a Fever. Flipgrid Fever!

My mom loves to tell this story from when I was a little girl. I was sleeping over at my Grandparent’s house. I woke up in the middle of the night. Walked down the steep farmhouse stairs and started running around the kitchen island repeating, “I have a fever. I have a fever. I have a fever.” Until everyone in the house was awake and knew I had a fever.

My name is Aubrey DiOrio and I have Flipgrid Fever. This is one fever I hope is contagious.

I use Flipgrid to hear every voice in my class. Realistically, it isn’t possible for me to hear every child’s response to every question I ask. With Flipgrid it is. I use Flipgrid when I want to hear from every student and I want them to hear from every single one of their friends. Fliprid is a student voice machine.

One reason I love Flipgrid is that it has a flow that makes sense. Whether you access through the web or the app, it automatically prompts you to put in a grid code. Once you have accessed the grid there is a HUGE GREEN PLUS SIGN. From there it leads you through a selfie video response and the posting process. There are few options making it intuitive for all students. Once students understand this flow, they need very little support.

Other things I love:

  • I can attach content of my choice to any topic.
  • The directions for the topic show up with the selfie video so you can focus your video as you take it.
  • All the topics I assign to my class are connected to 1 grid and they can get to any of them by backing out of the current one.
  • Emoji reactions. Enough said.
  • Grid/Topic sharing for a global connection
  • Video replies (paid version – makes it SOOOO worth it!)
  • Video length requires students to be concise.
  • Video length is adjustable.
  • The stickers are so fun!

I have used Flipgrid with my class to reflect on a lesson, share their writing, share ideas, as a quick assessment, connect with each other over snow days, discuss books, celebrate holidays, connect on curriculum with other classes across the district and country. My students are learning to communicate clearly through these videos. They are learning to speak so others can hear and understand and truly listen to one another through these videos. Flipgrid takes away any anxiety they may have for speaking in front of the class because they can practice and re-record.

 

I also use Flipgrid professionally. It has amazing potential to connect PLNs on a more personal level. I participate in a twice-monthly slow flip chat in the #InnovatingPlay and #GAfE4Littles communities. I’m also co-moderating a book study with Caitlin McCommons using Flipgrid as a flexible connection tool. The ability to see faces and hear voices allows you to make connections that feel deeper than a Twitter connection. I feel like I have a professional relationship with people who live far away because of the conversations we have on Flipgrid.

Have you caught the fever? Share your favorite ways to Flipgrid below. If you are ready to catch Flipgrid Fever, I’d love to help you get started!

Planning for Pixel Art and Fact Fluency

I need to share this experience with anyone who will listen (read). I’m an active member of the #GAfE4Littles and #InnovatingPlay online communities and they recently merged. Chirstine Pinto just released her first book, Google Apps for LittlesJessica Twomey challenges the community with regular invitations to play. The March invitation was to choose an activity from Christine’s book to complete in your classroom. Christine and Jessica created questions for participants to respond to around that challenge on Flipgrid. The questions took participants through the planning process and challenged our thinking as well as encouraging us to take the activity we chose even further. I have only used Google Apps with my littles a tiny bit. And when I say tiny, I mean twice. I am not one to turn down a challenge so I ordered my book and selected and activity!

Question 1 – Choose an activity and share why it is meaningful.
https://flipgrid.com/0100f4?embed=true

I wanted to pick something that I could implement in my classroom right away. I started flipping through the book but I almost immediately turned to the Pixel Art page. It jumped out at me because we just started our unit on addition and subtraction fluency (#math1OA6). The group I have this year needs me to keep things fresh. I knew I couldn’t teach this unit the regular way because they would get bored. The Pixel Art page gave a suggestion for taking the activity further by turning the Pixel Art into a puzzle by inputting equations. This was exactly what I needed for my kids. They can solve an equation quickly, but can they create the equations fluently with the total or difference in mind.

Question 2 – Anticipate challenges.

(Nevermind my struggle with stickers)
https://flipgrid.com/282116?embed=true
I was concerned about device availability because right now we have mostly iPads. I was able to totally avoid this problem because I signed out laptops from our computer lab. I also wanted to be able to format the cells to have a color assigned to the 2 digit number 10 but Alice Keeler‘s blog post on starting from scratch went totally over my head. I am a spreadsheet newbie. So, I stuck with the original preformatted sheet she shared. This worked out great because the colors on there matched the colors of snap cubes I have.

Question 3 – Personalize and Extend the Learning.

https://flipgrid.com/da8fe5?embed=true
In creating Pixel Art, students have the choice to create anything they want. This activity has built-in personalization. We will continue to extend the activity through adding equations that will turn the art into a puzzle for a friend to solve. I plan to change one of my literacy centers and one of my math stations toa Google Assignment on Google Classroom and recreating Pixel Art will be one of them. Students will be able to play both with the snap cubes and the spreadsheet prior to the creation of their Pixel Art

I bet you are ready to see how it went….

Pixel Art in Action

I introduced my students to the activity by showing them some examples of Pixel Art like this tweet from Ryan Read who is doing Pixel Art with is high school students

I didn’t even finish my first sentence when one student shouted out, “It’s like Minecraft!” I had them hooked! I grabbed the snap cube tubs and dumped them and they got started right away.

They created everything from footballs to Pokemon, cats to Steve from Minecraft, and college logos to flowers. They spend nearly an hour creating their Pixel Art models. My students are so used to grabbing cubes to count and not worrying about the colors that I did have to help them think about the colors they wanted to use because in this activity, color is important. They also struggled with the idea of making their Pixel Art “flat” and not 3 dimensional.

Day 2 was our “play with the spreadsheet” day. I modeled the process of getting to the spreadsheet through our Google Classroom and then typing single digit numbers and using the arrow keys to navigate around. I showed them how to delete if they didn’t want that color and made a color key on the left side of my spreadsheet. They actually didn’t play around like I expected. They went right to work making their own key and then inputting the numbers to create a digital model of their Pixel Art. We duplicated the sheet to be ready for equations the next day. This saves a Pixel Art sheet as the “answer key” and allows for one to be the puzzle.

Day 3 we talked about fast fact fluency and why learning to add and subtract quickly is important in life. We talked about some strategies we have always used to solve equations and how to use those strategies mentally. They practiced those strategies through a game.

On day 4, I modeled making a list of equations for each total they needed based on the colors in our math notebooks. Then how to use that list to type equations in each cell turning the Pixel Art into a puzzle. We had some questions and concerns about the entire equation not showing up in the cell (because it is small) and how to see it all so you know it’s there, moving to other cells, and how to get a plus sign. One student picked it up quickly and rushed to help anyone who needed it. He was like our own IT department. By the time I got to students who had raised their hand for help, either they problem solved and figured it out or the IT department showed them what to do. I was blown away by their independence and ability to complete their pixel art. I still have a few who need to complete theirs this week.

One thing I love about my class and this activity is they/it differentiate on their own. This friend struggles to write his thinking so he used the cubes to model the equations before typing them into his spreadsheet. He moved one cube at a time to make sure he got all of the equations for a given number and was able to record both the addition and subtraction equation that goes with the number he wanted (#math1OA5).

Up next, is sharing the Pixel Art with a friend to see if they can solve the Puzzle. I ran into a roadblock here. In our district, students can’t share a document with another student. But, since I have access to their finished Pixel Art Puzzles, I think I can share it for them. We’ll duplicate the sheet again to keep the originals intact. I also plan on showing them how to rename the sheets so its easier to identify which tab is which. Watch me on Twitter for this next stage. I’ll also update here once we’re finished.

I challenge you to get the book and use some of the activities in your class. Or use this one by using the template on Alice Keeler’s blog I shared above. One third grade teacher at my school plans to use this with her class and division.

I also challenge you to think through the planning process using the method laid out by Jessica and Christine. I know I plan to use it again!

  1. identify the standard, activity, and technology (if needed)
  2. anticipate challenges
  3. personalize and extend the learning
  4. embed play
  5. SHARE

Making Family Connections – mulitple methods

In early education, it is important to make connections and build relationships early. It’s obvious to any teacher that we should be doing this in our classrooms with our students but we also need to make these connections and relationships with our students’ families. This is an area where I am still growing.

This isn’t always easy. Some caregivers didn’t have strong or positive school experiences and tend to shy away from involvement opportunities. Some families don’t have access to transportation and need other access points into the school world. Some families may not be “traditional” and may not feel included in school life. I recently discussed this topic with my PLN in the #NCSnowChat

The general consensus was that we should use inclusive language, ask questions, and listen to understand. During this conversation, a few different methods for making those family connections came up frequently. The rest of this blog post will explore my thoughts on using different “tools” for making connections with families. Please chime in with your ideas and opinions in the comments below!

Seesaw/Dojo/Remind (fill in the blank tech tool)

I love Love LOVE Seesaw! It is my go-to for student choice. I love connecting with families on Seesaw and my students enjoy interacting with their families in real time. This year, Seesaw changed from a parent app to a family app and this subtle shift in name, with more inclusive language, makes their product more accessible to more families. Now, 10 family members can connect to a student’s journal and interact digitally. I encourage families to leave comments on their student’s work. The best comments are questions that students need to respond to. I partnered with Caitlin McCommons to give a Seesaw training to parents at our school. One of the resources we shared was a comment list. This gives parents ideas for leaving feedback to their student that helps continue the learning.

That being said, I think teachers need to be careful relying on these tools as a method of communication. I say this as a teacher who used Remind to communicate with families on a daily basis! Using technology tools creates stronger connections with SOME families but is not always accessible to ALL families. Think about it, does every family have a computer (no), does every family have a smartphone (most likely), does every family have internet access (no), does every family have data cell plans (no). You can argue that they can go to the library or so many places have free wifi. Go for it. BUT, would YOU go to the library or to a free public wifi location every time YOU wanted to get online for something? If you did would an app like these be your top priority or would you be paying your bills? I challenge relying on these tech tools for family connections. It is one way but should not be your only way.

Email

I communicate through email like 90% of the time and I know that not all my families have regular access to email, not all families read the emails I sent and might prefer a different method of communication. I choose email because it is convenient and comfortable for me. I’ve come to this realization:

IT’S NOT ABOUT ME!

And I need to change the way I do things to make better connections with students and families. I’m working on building relationships with better face to face interactions and more phone calls

Phone Calls

Real talk – I hate talking on the phone. I don’t like talking on the phone to my own friends and family much less calling the families of my students! I know there are people out there who like it and can spend hours on the phone but I just get … bored? awkward? I would rather type something through a text, email, or social media or hang out with someone face to face than talk on the phone. I took a step outside my comfort zone and called all of my families two weeks ago. It took a lot out of me. However, the families really appreciated it! I didn’t even call for a specific reason. I just called to check in. The conversations I had ranged from questions about lunch to assessments, something their child said that confused them to their last/upcoming family trip, new dance classes to current class size legislation. I have to say, as much as I dislike talking on the phone, I enjoyed these conversations and I feel like I built relationships. I’m going to continue these types check-in calls every 3-4 weeks. (If you’re reading this, ask me about it to keep me accountable ok?)

Face to Face

To me, these are the best connections. I enjoy spending time with people. I think that tone of voice, facial expression, and gestures help people communicate. I like parent-teacher conferences. I like to sit down and talk, share work, and celebrate growth with families. I have done traditional parent-teacher conferences and student-led conferences in the past. (How I run student-led conferences is another post for another day.) I like both methods for littles. Sometimes it’s not appropriate to have a student or other families present for a conversation. And, I don’t like to rely on one method. This year I’m going to try goal setting conferences (coming up in the next few weeks) with families before our student-led conferences. I’ll keep you posted on how that goes. I also try to be flexible with my conference times. I know that families have different routines and need options. Ideally, I like to offer morning, during the day, and evening time slots. Some families can’t leave work early for a conference and need other options. I pick 1 evening where I stay at school late to accommodate them. This year, I’m going to offer some weekend time slots as well.

In the Community

Making connections with families in the community can be fun! I used to avoid running into families at the grocery store or Target. But now that I don’t live in my school community, these chance encounters are special. It is so fun to see a family out in the world interacting and the students are always surprised to see their teacher, not at school. They treat you like a celebrity! Our school PTA plans family nights out to local businesses as fundraisers or to support our sponsors. I love going to these events to see current and former families. The conversations are so natural and not just about school life and academics. I feel like I create genuine connections. This year, with my team, we planned a weekend outing to the arcade. We planned to be there during a certain time and invited families to come and play with us. We used it to launch our arcade building PBL for our force and motion science standard (Sci1P1). It was so much fun to play games with my kids and have meaningful conversations using vocabulary we were using at school while making a real-world connection to the content we were learning. I enjoyed this so much, I would like to plan other community outings for my families!

I have in the past and will continue to use a combination of all of these methods and tools for family connections because developing a strong, collaborative relationship with my students and their families is important to me.

After starting this blog post and outlining it, I participated in a #SlowFlipChat with Jessica Twomey and Christine Pinto in the #InnovatingPlay and #GAfE4Littles community using Flipgrid as a tool for communication. The topic was *drum roll please*

Making Connections!

And that chat inspired me to finish writing this post. You should totally go check it out. I’ll make it easy for you, click here.

I didn’t even know, but I was doing #booksnaps

I’ve been doing this really cool thing for over 2 years and had no idea it was a thing until last year! Ever since I started using Seesaw in my classroom, I’ve had students posting about the books they read. It started with a picture of the cover of the book and recording as they read or taking a video of their reading. This task helped build fluency and understanding (RL.K.10).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a586b168-28cc-46cb-b579-d0d549f6f1ee&share_token=WR6lMaK_RhSXgJbfpTUuZg&mode=embed
Then we moved to a photo of the cover and retelling the story (RL.K.2). Eventually we began taking photos of the pages of the book and explaining how the picture supports the text (RL.K.7). And then it happened. I asked the students to identify the “expert words” in an informational book and one of my students used the label tool and labeled the expert words in the picture and then recorded to explain them (RI.K.4).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.279af4b0-89a6-496b-bba9-7b326ff0127a&share_token=mAWp-IWLTqCdc7Bf_d-ogA&mode=embed

This changed everything! I realized how much more I know about his understanding of the text and that he is applying the minilessons to his independent practice. Annotating the picture gave me way more information than simply having students record to tell. This in-the-moment decision this little friend made changed everything for me! I realized that I needed to be doing more book responses this way. I began encouraging students to post their responses with labels and using the drawing tool to explain their thinking.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.2d754895-473c-4ea3-8e50-562be180b87a&share_token=xOH0efHSRceJJctycZOWdw&mode=embed
And then I wend to my first edcamp, edcamp wake March, 18 2017. I went to a session on booksnaps because I had seen the idea floating around twitter and wasn’t quite sure what it was. Turns out this was one of the edcamp sessions where everyone turned up to learn something and no one really knew what it was or how to do it. After some on the spot collaborative research we were able to figure out that booksnaps were a way for students to share a reaction or their thinking on a specific section of a book using snapchat. And a light bulb went on in my head: “I do that! I just didn’t know it was a thing!” So I shared some of my students work and how we use Seesaw as a tool to share about the books we read. From this session I decided to be more intentional about students’ booksnaps and having them cite their source. I noticed that by the end of the school year, the more I asked them to include, the quality of showing what they know decreased.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.92c28d55-89b0-4efe-8ffc-36dd1c134c5b&share_token=_jHL1-SqR4qGayV8BB-hqQ&mode=embed

This year, I was more intentional about introducing booksnaps to my students and created an anchor chart to make sure all the parts were included.

This year, our booksnaps have been a much higher quality including, labels, drawing, emojis, captions, and voice recordings. I have added to this chart since this picture to include retell, character strengths, comparing and contrasting, and tell 3 things. I will continue to add to this chart all year as we focus our booksnaps on different standards and question types.

Main idea (RI.1.2)

 https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.97c37c36-f4f1-4a4f-8908-97408402ecea&share_token=28dEW_iNTKKZXzPLciZ6xQ&mode=embed

Reaction (RL.1.7)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.c8ec8582-2f7f-485b-a9f8-2c542142c0c9&share_token=oaflFyR5SKitPxgaQoI1kw&mode=embed

Compare and contrast characters (RL.1.9)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.61e71d97-8466-4999-b4d9-3d77b35b83f5&share_token=eDZUfHKxR7m9EWw84TJPaA&mode=embed

Tell 3 things (RI.1.8)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.740635e6-db52-4571-9048-7440f8630722&share_token=1TXS8ZMASwuORlh1nOAcSw&mode=embed

Our next step with booksnaps is to explore different technology tools to use. We will try some with flipgrid and chatterpix next.

What is your favorite tool for booksnaps? How do you make booksnaps accessible to your littles?

Strengths Based Approach (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 2) #IMMOOC

Feedback is the most influential, powerful practice teachers can implement in their classrooms. Research (Hattie) shows that no single other practice in a classroom has a greater impact on student learning than feedback. However, how often does feedback come in the form of negatives.

  • “You need to start your sentence with a capital.”
  • “Did that sound right? Try a different strategy.”
  • “Check your counting. You made a silly mistake. “

I’m guilty of this type of feedback myself. I think I’m helping my students. But what message are they actually hearing? I worry that it could be:

  • “I’m a terrible writer.”
  • “I can’t read.”
  • “I’m not good enough.”

I have to be mindful daily to focus on my students strengths. It’s a decision I have to make every 5 seconds: tell them what they did great or what they need to fix.

I find that I get my fristies’ attention and interest when I start with something they did great. They love to hear how amazing they are. I try to make a point of telling each of my firsties something I love about them every day. They need this positive affirmation.

Today on flipgrid, one of my firsties was WAY off in her response but I didn’t even address it right away. I started by telling her how amazing she is at selfies (and she’s better than I am!) She lit up and hung on my every word after that! We hit her grow area after she was able to glow!

#Eclipse2017

Anyone out there still working on their plan for The Great American Eclipse? In my area we have the opportunity to see about 90% of the total eclipse and I am TOTALLY nerding out! North Carolina just rolled out a new science standard for first grade 1.E.1 – Recognize the features and patterns of the earth/moon/sun system as observed from earth. This means #Eclipse2017 fits in my standards!!!! I’m just now getting my details worked out and thought I would share them. Please share yours in the comments section!

Wonder

One of my goals this year is inquiry based instruction. I’m going to begin our day by collecting questions my firsties have about the eclipse. I’m sure they have heard people talking about it and I want to gather what they know and wonders. This may require some last minute scrambling to make sure I address misconceptions and questions I’m not prepared for.

Video

Discovery Education has gathered some great video and image  resources for the eclipse. I’ll start with the one titled “Solar Eclipse.” We’ll watch it once and then I’ll have my firsties write one thing they learned on a sheet of paper. We will use the DE Spotlight on Strategy (SOS) Snowball Fight to review our learning from the video. Students will crumple their paper into a ball, throw it in the middle of the circle and on my cue pull one sheet of paper out and read it. We’ll then watch the video again. After a second video, students will pull 2 snowballs from the circle and add an idea from the video to their friends’ snowballs. We’ll then have some share time to discuss what we noticed from the video. You will probably be able to find a few good videos on You Tube if you don’t have access to Discovery Education.

Article

Reading A-Z has some great science content on Science A-Z. Their July issue has a short 1 page article I’m going to have my firsties read in pairs. After reading, they will use Flipgrid to share a selfie video of the most interesting thing from the article. If you don’t have access to this great resource, they offer a free 2 week trial! Also, Front Row is free and they have a few different short, leveled articles about the eclipse you can share.

Model the eclipse

I have a handful of flashlights and quarters I’m bringing to school tomorrow. Students will use these materials to work in groups of 3-4 to make a video of what they think will happen during the eclipse. They will post this video on Seesaw.

Eclipse Observation

I have this amazing observation sheet from my EDU buddy Bill Ferriter. I have made 5 copies for each student. We will go outside to observe for about 30 seconds. Then we will come inside to work on our observation sheets. We will go out for observation 5 different times during the eclipse so my firsties can see the changes in the sky and environment. Each time we come inside to reflect on observations, we will discuss what we saw and make a prediction of what it will look like next. I’ll have a student share their drawing  and together we will draw our predictions on a portable dry erase board.

Extras!

I just bought a Google Cardboard and they have a Virtual Reality App for the eclipse. It costs $0.99 but I think that is worth it! I only have 1 cardboard so they will have to take turns. I’m doing this before the eclipse will help curb their desire to look at the eclipse outside.


Discovery Education also has a bunch of other videos I can use for my firsties to gather more information. They are also streaming the eclipse live on the Science Channel if it is cloudy or something happens that we can’t go outside. We can also view this when the eclipse is over as we reflect on the experience.

If we have time, we will make this to help us act out the movements of the earth and moon around the sun and try to make it show a solar eclipse.

Mystery Science also has a great activity with all the content you will need!

Reflect

I’m going to use another DE SOS for students to reflect on their experience. I’ll have them recreate the eclipse with art materials then tell about it with the “3 truths and a lie” SOS. I’m going to have them start with 1 truth and 1 lie and add to it time permitting. We’ll write the truths and lies flipbook style so we can hang them in the hall and others can guess which is the truth and which is the lie and flip it up to see.

I also have other reflection ideas so this may change or, better yet, I’ll give them a choice. It’ll depend on how everything goes tomorrow.

  • SOS 6 Word Story
  • Another FlipGrid
  • Chatterpix
  • Seesaw

Note: It is NEVER safe to look directly at the sun! I have parent permission and NASA approved eclipse glasses for each of my firsties. We are going outside to view the eclipse. I will (obviously) be very strict about making sure they know the damage that can be done if they do not leave their glasses on their eyes. I’ve done my research and know that if they look with a naked eye they won’t feel pain because the retina doesn’t have pain receptors and they will have blurry or even lose their vision permanently. I’m going to be very up front and honest with my firsties and I trust them to follow my directions.

PS – I’ll take pictures tomorrow and edit this post after!