I Dove Into PBL & You Should Too!

I’m a north personality meaning I dive in head first and I’m not afraid to take risks. I jumped into PBL after reading only 1 chapter of Hacking Project Based Learning and finished that PBL, #PBLclouds, before finishing the book. I skimmed the book but didn’t read it. I learn best through trial and error and  I don’t need to all the details before buying into a new concept or method.

In addition to #PBL clouds, I now have done PBLs focusing on Sun, moon, and stars (planned as I went),

force and motion through the building of arcade games (I didn’t have a great guiding question)

and one on solving 2 major problems at recess through designing something to add to our playground spaces (more of a Problem Based Learning than Project and feedback was not intentional).

I am so interested in including inquiry-based approaches in my classroom, it is one of my Professional Development goals this school year and I am participating in a book study on The Curious Classroom. 

Here’s what I’ve learned so far:

  • It is not hard
  • It is time-consuming
  • You must plan ahead
  • You must be flexible

Here’s what I’m working on:

  • I need to improve at intentionally planning my PBLs. By that mean I am going to more fully dissect my standards searching for the High Impact Takeaways (HIT). Each learning experience within the PBL will then more clearly align to standard and lead toward an answer to the umbrella question. Planning this way will also help me see the cross-curricular connections. Once these are clear, I can use the PBL to reach more than one standard strand in more than one subject area.
  • I need to shift assessment responsibility to the students. For starters, assessments need to be more authentic and measured throughout the PBL. Currently, my assessments are based on observations and conversations with students about their work. I’m not 100% sure how this will look but I’ll figure it out! I’m thinking a documentation system that lays out my HITs and allows for comments and photos of evidence of student progress or mastery. If you have any suggestions, please reach out or leave a comment below!
  • Feedback needs to be a bigger focus in my PBLs. I want students to give me feedback, I want to be better about giving feedback to my students, and I want them to give feedback to each other. Focusing on feedback will ensure students have a deeper understanding of the concepts and standards within the PBL.

Here’s what’s next:

  • I’m working on a PBL share with my friend, Kara Damico. Together we planned and implemented a vertically aligned PBL on community impact through solving recess problems. We will be sharing, along with students about the impact this PBL had on student learning. We will also be working on writing this PBL up for possible publication within our district.
  • Part of my PD goal this year was to implement 1 PBL each quarter. I’m beginning the work on planning a community and map PBL to hit both the 1.E.1 and 1.G.1 NCSCOS Social Studies Units. Thoughts? Ideas? Resources?

I am by no means an expert on PBL but I do think I am slowly moving forward and growing in this area. I highly recommend the 2 books mentioned in this post and you’re welcome to borrow my copies if you want!

Strengths Based Approach (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 2) #IMMOOC

Feedback is the most influential, powerful practice teachers can implement in their classrooms. Research (Hattie) shows that no single other practice in a classroom has a greater impact on student learning than feedback. However, how often does feedback come in the form of negatives.

  • “You need to start your sentence with a capital.”
  • “Did that sound right? Try a different strategy.”
  • “Check your counting. You made a silly mistake. “

I’m guilty of this type of feedback myself. I think I’m helping my students. But what message are they actually hearing? I worry that it could be:

  • “I’m a terrible writer.”
  • “I can’t read.”
  • “I’m not good enough.”

I have to be mindful daily to focus on my students strengths. It’s a decision I have to make every 5 seconds: tell them what they did great or what they need to fix.

I find that I get my fristies’ attention and interest when I start with something they did great. They love to hear how amazing they are. I try to make a point of telling each of my firsties something I love about them every day. They need this positive affirmation.

Today on flipgrid, one of my firsties was WAY off in her response but I didn’t even address it right away. I started by telling her how amazing she is at selfies (and she’s better than I am!) She lit up and hung on my every word after that! We hit her grow area after she was able to glow!

Purposeful Focus Areas (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 1) #IMMOOC #ObserveMe

I try to pick 2-3 areas I want to improve on each school year. This summer I was introduced to the #ObserveMe challenge. Teachers post a sign outside their door, share on social media to invite others into their rooms to observe them and provide feedback.

This year my focus areas are:

  1. Student collaboration
  2. Evidence of inquiry based learning
  3. Positive student relationships

My action steps include:

  1. Regular opportunities for students to collaborate combined with direct instruction on how to collaborate effectively.
  2. Professional Development and book study on inquiry based learning, and Project Based Learning. My goal here is to teach all my science units as PBLs and my challenge is to try at least one PBL in another subject area.
  3. Read the Morning Meeting book and practice and improve upon morning meeting daily! My goal is to never rush morning meeting because that time together is so powerful for relationship building.

I chose to participate in #ObserveMe in the hope that I could collect feedback from peers, parents, and administrators frequently. Then have the time to reflect on that feedback and act on it. I’m struggling with actually getting people to come into my room. I would love to hear your ideas for getting people in my room!

Below is my #ObserveMe sign! I challenge YOU!

Hacking PBL – book reflection

I wanted to compile my books snaps and other creations after reading Hacking PBL in an easy to see format. 

Hack 1


Hack 2

https://padlet.com/embed/wxjheok9dr7ohttps://padlet.com/embed/wxjheok9dr7o

Made with Padlet

Hack 3

Displaying Is it PBL worthy?.jpg

Hack 4

Planning PBLs

Things I’m doing that are in the same family as PBL: STEM/STEAM, Genius Hour!

MUST be flexible!

Hack 5


Hack 6

Assessment

On my todo list- try shifting the ownership of assessment to the students. It will look different in kindergarten but I think it can be done. #innovate4littles #kindersCAN

Hack 7

Feedback

Things I’m doing:

2 stars and a wish – students do this with parents at student led conferences but I can shift the protocol to be used by them to eachother. Students share 2 positives or compliments and 1 thing they want to do better.

glows and grows – I use this protocol when reflecting with my class as a whole group. Since they are familiar with it they can use it with peers. I ask for or  share things in a lesson or activity that glowed and things that can grow.

Hack 8


Hack 9

Student understanding can be measure by more than a standard test. Student performance can measure understanding in a deeper way than a standard test. Your assessment should look and feel like the instruction. Understanding shouldn’t be measured 1 way 1 time.

Hack 10

Students should be sharing projects with the world because realistically that’s what people do. This is a good time to harness the power of social media. It’s important to help children build a positive digital footprint early. When using social media it is importanto teach digital citizenship frequently.