Blended Learning with Littles

A blended learning environment is one in which technology and “offline” teaching are seamlessly intertwined throughout the day. Blended learning environments allow for student agency, passions, and mastery to grow.

21st Century Learning

In the 21st Century Framework, students use digital tools, collaboration, communication, creativity, critical thinking (The 4 Cs), and other career readiness skills to curriculum standards. In the 21st Century Framework, teachers design lessons, and experiences that pull in multiple skills listed above. Teachers must model risk-taking and perseverance. Teachers must also look for ways to include a global perspective in their curriculum. A blended learning environment provides teachers with tools to use to teach the skills and perspectives outlined by the 21st Century Framework. In a blended learning environment, students can use devices to share their learning with the world through Twitter, Instagram, a Seesaw blog, or other tools. Students can complete work in a way that makes sense to them. They can use a digital tool like Seesaw, Flipgrid, or Google Classroom to collaborate and communicate with one another. They can use their creativity to respond to assignments or teacher prompts using tools like pic collage, Seesaw, Chatterpix, and more. Students can apply critical thinking by considering their digital footprint prior to sharing with the world, solving problems with a team, or deciding which digital tool works best for them when given a choice.img_0862default

The 4Cs

Blending technology into your lessons allows for opportunities for students to experience the 4Cs. Blended learning can consist of student choices in response to learning. Students need to think Critically (1) about the task at hand and the best way to Communicate (2) their learning with others. I have given students choices for Letterland phonics sorts to use either Seesaw or paper and pencil. My kindergarteners figured out which way worked best for them and stuck with that method. In my kindergarten and first grade classrooms, we use #BookSnaps to reflect on text reading. Students have a choice in how they respond to that text and are very Creative (3) in their text annotating using labels, drawing, and emojis to annotate the text. I encourage students to Collaborate (4) and work together on one device. You know the saying 2 heads are better than one. Well, it still holds true when kids are creating content using technology. They aren’t only sharing their learning but they are learning ways to work on a team. Because a blended learning environment encourages collaboration, we don’t need to be 1:1 with students to devices in order to have a blended environment. There are times in my classroom where we use 1:1 and times where only 4 devices get used and the kids work together.

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Access to multiple types of devices grows flexibility

I’ve heard people say they don’t like technology in the classroom because technology changes frequently and just when you get used to something there is something new out there. I love that technology changes all the time. It forces us to be flexible, a super important executive functioning skill. In my classroom (not by choice) I have 2 desktop computers, one laptop, 5 iPad 2s, 1 newer iPad, my teacher laptop, my old iPhone 6, and 2 of my personal devices I let kids use occasionally (a chromebook and an iPhone 8 plus), and because of BYOD we have various models of iPads and iPand minis. Soon, we are getting new chromebooks from the district. The variety of devices that my students have access too requires them to transfer skills to different types of operating systems and to problem solve when something doesn’t work. I have kids who prefer the desktop computers for one task, an iPad for another, and my old phone for another. We have that flexibility for them to find what works best for them.

Learning first Technology Second

It is important to remember that the learning always needs to come first. Technology should support the learning. It never comes first in my planning process. I start by looking at my standards and unpacking what that means for students. My next step is to decide how we will approach the standard and how it should break down for student learning. Sometimes technology fits in and amplifies the learning, other times it doesn’t. Sometimes my devices sit without being touched all day and sometimes we use them in every block. Sometimes I don’t plan for technology but my students find a way to amplify their own learning and voices during a lesson or learning experience using technology and clearly I have to allow it! Like I said at the top, a blended learning environment includes both technology AND “offline” learning. It is important to know your standards, know your kids, and plan appropriately.

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Seesaw! My go to for student choice

What is Seesaw

Seesaw is a digital portfolio platform that can be scaled for students pre-k-12. It is simple and intuitive for littles but also provides opportunities for critical thinking, communication, and feedback that can reach students through 12th grade. Seesaw allows students to post to their journal and a class feed with photo, video, text, drawing, or google doc integration responses. Students can scroll through the class feed and like or comment on their peer’s responses. Student responses can be organized in folders for easy searchability. Parents can connect to their child’s Seesaw journal and like and comment their work as well as see progress over time.

Why I Seesaw

I seesaw because it provides students with opportunities to express themselves through multiple methods. I love the choices it provides students as they share their learning and reflections. I love that kids can practice citizenship by commenting on each other’s posts. Seesaw is like social media for kids. It is a great way to model appropriate digital behavior and moderate as they practice.

How I Seesaw

For the last 3 years that I have used Seesaw, my students have quickly become Seesaw experts. They are able to post to their journal quickly and independently. I use Seesaw for a variety of things. The list below includes things my students have posted (both kindergarten and first grade):

  • Math Story Problems
      • Students need to be able to create their own story problems in order to fully understand how they work. Writing their own helps them play with the language used in a story problem and therefore provides them access to better understanding story problems that need solving. After posting a story problem, students then scroll through the feed to solve others’ story problems. They have learned to write better problems that require multiple steps and make sure to include a question at the end and not the answer! This has been one of my math stations for the last 2 years and they LOVE it! I change out the manipulatives for them occasionally to keep things fun and interesting! (#math1OA2)

    https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=embed

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a43f96cc-65f3-482c-b175-361d04a19641&share_token=6XyASDNIRAGDSxX36yJHwA&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.ded27a4f-dcb4-4f67-b671-ced42b19c3c0&share_token=FSelo5GOTWSLmfdIY_fF6Q&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.62d78ca1-2eea-45bb-9717-22da9d82b64d&share_token=ycae-zyARtu7maMObWaQ9w&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.d9c52808-a4cc-4ed8-b867-ca8aa6736bb2&share_token=cjhglUSHSY-vTjCAaRcWWw&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.08e03b4e-6b56-4ec7-a594-42be62810f4a&share_token=kNoufDy0Qumkv0s1AzPqOw&mode=share

  • Relationship building
    • Students also share photos on Seesaw at home. I love getting notifications on the weekend of baby brothers and sisters, road trips, a book they’re reading, and songs they made up. I even had a student upload a video to Seesaw in the car as they were moving to another state!

I would love for you to share in the comments why you Seesaw or your favorite things for students to upload on their student Journals!

Not included in this post: encouraging positive interactions through likes and comments and family involvement! Those are blog posts for a different time!

I didn’t even know, but I was doing #booksnaps

I’ve been doing this really cool thing for over 2 years and had no idea it was a thing until last year! Ever since I started using Seesaw in my classroom, I’ve had students posting about the books they read. It started with a picture of the cover of the book and recording as they read or taking a video of their reading. This task helped build fluency and understanding (RL.K.10).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a586b168-28cc-46cb-b579-d0d549f6f1ee&share_token=WR6lMaK_RhSXgJbfpTUuZg&mode=embed
Then we moved to a photo of the cover and retelling the story (RL.K.2). Eventually we began taking photos of the pages of the book and explaining how the picture supports the text (RL.K.7). And then it happened. I asked the students to identify the “expert words” in an informational book and one of my students used the label tool and labeled the expert words in the picture and then recorded to explain them (RI.K.4).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.279af4b0-89a6-496b-bba9-7b326ff0127a&share_token=mAWp-IWLTqCdc7Bf_d-ogA&mode=embed

This changed everything! I realized how much more I know about his understanding of the text and that he is applying the minilessons to his independent practice. Annotating the picture gave me way more information than simply having students record to tell. This in-the-moment decision this little friend made changed everything for me! I realized that I needed to be doing more book responses this way. I began encouraging students to post their responses with labels and using the drawing tool to explain their thinking.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.2d754895-473c-4ea3-8e50-562be180b87a&share_token=xOH0efHSRceJJctycZOWdw&mode=embed
And then I wend to my first edcamp, edcamp wake March, 18 2017. I went to a session on booksnaps because I had seen the idea floating around twitter and wasn’t quite sure what it was. Turns out this was one of the edcamp sessions where everyone turned up to learn something and no one really knew what it was or how to do it. After some on the spot collaborative research we were able to figure out that booksnaps were a way for students to share a reaction or their thinking on a specific section of a book using snapchat. And a light bulb went on in my head: “I do that! I just didn’t know it was a thing!” So I shared some of my students work and how we use Seesaw as a tool to share about the books we read. From this session I decided to be more intentional about students’ booksnaps and having them cite their source. I noticed that by the end of the school year, the more I asked them to include, the quality of showing what they know decreased.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.92c28d55-89b0-4efe-8ffc-36dd1c134c5b&share_token=_jHL1-SqR4qGayV8BB-hqQ&mode=embed

This year, I was more intentional about introducing booksnaps to my students and created an anchor chart to make sure all the parts were included.

This year, our booksnaps have been a much higher quality including, labels, drawing, emojis, captions, and voice recordings. I have added to this chart since this picture to include retell, character strengths, comparing and contrasting, and tell 3 things. I will continue to add to this chart all year as we focus our booksnaps on different standards and question types.

Main idea (RI.1.2)

 https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.97c37c36-f4f1-4a4f-8908-97408402ecea&share_token=28dEW_iNTKKZXzPLciZ6xQ&mode=embed

Reaction (RL.1.7)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.c8ec8582-2f7f-485b-a9f8-2c542142c0c9&share_token=oaflFyR5SKitPxgaQoI1kw&mode=embed

Compare and contrast characters (RL.1.9)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.61e71d97-8466-4999-b4d9-3d77b35b83f5&share_token=eDZUfHKxR7m9EWw84TJPaA&mode=embed

Tell 3 things (RI.1.8)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.740635e6-db52-4571-9048-7440f8630722&share_token=1TXS8ZMASwuORlh1nOAcSw&mode=embed

Our next step with booksnaps is to explore different technology tools to use. We will try some with flipgrid and chatterpix next.

What is your favorite tool for booksnaps? How do you make booksnaps accessible to your littles?

Hacking PBL – book reflection

I wanted to compile my books snaps and other creations after reading Hacking PBL in an easy to see format. 

Hack 1


Hack 2

https://padlet.com/embed/wxjheok9dr7ohttps://padlet.com/embed/wxjheok9dr7o

Made with Padlet

Hack 3

Displaying Is it PBL worthy?.jpg

Hack 4

Planning PBLs

Things I’m doing that are in the same family as PBL: STEM/STEAM, Genius Hour!

MUST be flexible!

Hack 5


Hack 6

Assessment

On my todo list- try shifting the ownership of assessment to the students. It will look different in kindergarten but I think it can be done. #innovate4littles #kindersCAN

Hack 7

Feedback

Things I’m doing:

2 stars and a wish – students do this with parents at student led conferences but I can shift the protocol to be used by them to eachother. Students share 2 positives or compliments and 1 thing they want to do better.

glows and grows – I use this protocol when reflecting with my class as a whole group. Since they are familiar with it they can use it with peers. I ask for or  share things in a lesson or activity that glowed and things that can grow.

Hack 8


Hack 9

Student understanding can be measure by more than a standard test. Student performance can measure understanding in a deeper way than a standard test. Your assessment should look and feel like the instruction. Understanding shouldn’t be measured 1 way 1 time.

Hack 10

Students should be sharing projects with the world because realistically that’s what people do. This is a good time to harness the power of social media. It’s important to help children build a positive digital footprint early. When using social media it is importanto teach digital citizenship frequently.