Seesaw! My go to for student choice

What is Seesaw

Seesaw is a digital portfolio platform that can be scaled for students pre-k-12. It is simple and intuitive for littles but also provides opportunities for critical thinking, communication, and feedback that can reach students through 12th grade. Seesaw allows students to post to their journal and a class feed with photo, video, text, drawing, or google doc integration responses. Students can scroll through the class feed and like or comment on their peer’s responses. Student responses can be organized in folders for easy searchability. Parents can connect to their child’s Seesaw journal and like and comment their work as well as see progress over time.

Why I Seesaw

I seesaw because it provides students with opportunities to express themselves through multiple methods. I love the choices it provides students as they share their learning and reflections. I love that kids can practice citizenship by commenting on each other’s posts. Seesaw is like social media for kids. It is a great way to model appropriate digital behavior and moderate as they practice.

How I Seesaw

For the last 3 years that I have used Seesaw, my students have quickly become Seesaw experts. They are able to post to their journal quickly and independently. I use Seesaw for a variety of things. The list below includes things my students have posted (both kindergarten and first grade):

  • Math Story Problems
      • Students need to be able to create their own story problems in order to fully understand how they work. Writing their own helps them play with the language used in a story problem and therefore provides them access to better understanding story problems that need solving. After posting a story problem, students then scroll through the feed to solve others’ story problems. They have learned to write better problems that require multiple steps and make sure to include a question at the end and not the answer! This has been one of my math stations for the last 2 years and they LOVE it! I change out the manipulatives for them occasionally to keep things fun and interesting! (#math1OA2)

    https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=embed

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.42ce1265-2173-43c2-9814-bd8f33ddf75f&share_token=gTvKg3TwQAGdICDoLdcVOg&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a43f96cc-65f3-482c-b175-361d04a19641&share_token=6XyASDNIRAGDSxX36yJHwA&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.ded27a4f-dcb4-4f67-b671-ced42b19c3c0&share_token=FSelo5GOTWSLmfdIY_fF6Q&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.62d78ca1-2eea-45bb-9717-22da9d82b64d&share_token=ycae-zyARtu7maMObWaQ9w&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.d9c52808-a4cc-4ed8-b867-ca8aa6736bb2&share_token=cjhglUSHSY-vTjCAaRcWWw&mode=share

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.08e03b4e-6b56-4ec7-a594-42be62810f4a&share_token=kNoufDy0Qumkv0s1AzPqOw&mode=share

  • Relationship building
    • Students also share photos on Seesaw at home. I love getting notifications on the weekend of baby brothers and sisters, road trips, a book they’re reading, and songs they made up. I even had a student upload a video to Seesaw in the car as they were moving to another state!

I would love for you to share in the comments why you Seesaw or your favorite things for students to upload on their student Journals!

Not included in this post: encouraging positive interactions through likes and comments and family involvement! Those are blog posts for a different time!

The 5 W’s of Breakout Edu with Littles

I see it as my mission to take all the innovative pracitces popular in education and make them accessible to littles. Breakout Edu was a tough one for me. I played around with it in my head for a long time before actually trying it. I’ve still only done it a handful of times and I love it. I’m interested in creating my own breakout puzzles.

Why I like breakout boxes…

Breakout boxes provide students with the opportunity to practice problem solving strategies. They encourage students to persevere and show some grit. They allow students to collaborate toward a common goal. Breakout boxes can hit so many standards and hit every one of the 4Cs all at once! And, they are SO FUN!

What I’ve tried…

I’ve chosen breakout boxes that focus on solving different types of story problems (OA.1.1, OA.1.3, OA.1.5) and ones that focus on answering questions about a story (RL.1.1). I found these breakout boxes on BreakoutEdu.com. I printed all the materials and followed the instructions to assemble my box and set up the puzzles around the room.

I introduced the problem and their goal to unlock the box. The math breakout we did had a football story (it was the beginning of the season and I have students super into sports). We had to unlock the footballs for the team. In the literacy box, the mouse locked up our markers and we needed to break them free or lose them forever! I broke my class into groups (one for each puzzle), set the timer, and set them free. We rotated around to all the puzzles until everyone had a chance to solve them all.

Who are the Breakout boxes for and how I made them more accessible for littles…

I planned my first breakout box for my whole class to do at the same time. I split them into small groups so they had to work on 1 puzzle at a time and I rotated them around as they seemed to reach a solution. The second time, we partnered with a second grade class and they had free range to solve the puzzles around the room with their second grade buddy or a group of their choosing. Both of these methods worked well with my students however, they made a lot of mistakes when I turned on the timer. My advice for making breakout boxes more accessible for littles…

DON’T SET THE TIMER!

Woah! My kids got so obsessed about how much time was left they made silly mistakes on problems I KNEW they could solve otherwise. As soon as I turned off the timer and they felt safe to take their time and solve the puzzles, they were much more successful and were able to breakout. I tried twice thinking the first time it was just the newness. But, they had the same reaction to the timer both times. I will no longer use the timer with my littles.

When I do a breakout box…

I tried a breakout box with my class as a culminating event for our math unit right before an assessment and they did well. However, it took nearly 3 hours to do. I pretty much lost the rest of my day.

About once a month my district has early release days where the students go home early but the teachers stay normal hours for professional development. I’ve found that these early release days are the best for breakout boxes because they fill up our day, they’re fun, students are engaged in rigorous work focused on multiple standards.

The next one I did was on one of these early release days and in the middle of our study on making predictions. The breakout box went with If You Take A Mouse To School. Students were familiar with this book since we had already read it and made predictions throughout. When we returned from specials, the room was a mess and the mouse left us a message about our missing markers. This worked great and really piqued their imaginations. No one predicted the mouse would come to OUR school!

Where I’m going…

My next plan is to try to start creating my own breakout boxes for my students. This way I can decide on specific curriculum points to hit and include my students’ interests.

 

I didn’t even know, but I was doing #booksnaps

I’ve been doing this really cool thing for over 2 years and had no idea it was a thing until last year! Ever since I started using Seesaw in my classroom, I’ve had students posting about the books they read. It started with a picture of the cover of the book and recording as they read or taking a video of their reading. This task helped build fluency and understanding (RL.K.10).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.a586b168-28cc-46cb-b579-d0d549f6f1ee&share_token=WR6lMaK_RhSXgJbfpTUuZg&mode=embed
Then we moved to a photo of the cover and retelling the story (RL.K.2). Eventually we began taking photos of the pages of the book and explaining how the picture supports the text (RL.K.7). And then it happened. I asked the students to identify the “expert words” in an informational book and one of my students used the label tool and labeled the expert words in the picture and then recorded to explain them (RI.K.4).
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.279af4b0-89a6-496b-bba9-7b326ff0127a&share_token=mAWp-IWLTqCdc7Bf_d-ogA&mode=embed

This changed everything! I realized how much more I know about his understanding of the text and that he is applying the minilessons to his independent practice. Annotating the picture gave me way more information than simply having students record to tell. This in-the-moment decision this little friend made changed everything for me! I realized that I needed to be doing more book responses this way. I began encouraging students to post their responses with labels and using the drawing tool to explain their thinking.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.2d754895-473c-4ea3-8e50-562be180b87a&share_token=xOH0efHSRceJJctycZOWdw&mode=embed
And then I wend to my first edcamp, edcamp wake March, 18 2017. I went to a session on booksnaps because I had seen the idea floating around twitter and wasn’t quite sure what it was. Turns out this was one of the edcamp sessions where everyone turned up to learn something and no one really knew what it was or how to do it. After some on the spot collaborative research we were able to figure out that booksnaps were a way for students to share a reaction or their thinking on a specific section of a book using snapchat. And a light bulb went on in my head: “I do that! I just didn’t know it was a thing!” So I shared some of my students work and how we use Seesaw as a tool to share about the books we read. From this session I decided to be more intentional about students’ booksnaps and having them cite their source. I noticed that by the end of the school year, the more I asked them to include, the quality of showing what they know decreased.
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.92c28d55-89b0-4efe-8ffc-36dd1c134c5b&share_token=_jHL1-SqR4qGayV8BB-hqQ&mode=embed

This year, I was more intentional about introducing booksnaps to my students and created an anchor chart to make sure all the parts were included.

This year, our booksnaps have been a much higher quality including, labels, drawing, emojis, captions, and voice recordings. I have added to this chart since this picture to include retell, character strengths, comparing and contrasting, and tell 3 things. I will continue to add to this chart all year as we focus our booksnaps on different standards and question types.

Main idea (RI.1.2)

 https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.97c37c36-f4f1-4a4f-8908-97408402ecea&share_token=28dEW_iNTKKZXzPLciZ6xQ&mode=embed

Reaction (RL.1.7)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.c8ec8582-2f7f-485b-a9f8-2c542142c0c9&share_token=oaflFyR5SKitPxgaQoI1kw&mode=embed

Compare and contrast characters (RL.1.9)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.61e71d97-8466-4999-b4d9-3d77b35b83f5&share_token=eDZUfHKxR7m9EWw84TJPaA&mode=embed

Tell 3 things (RI.1.8)
https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.740635e6-db52-4571-9048-7440f8630722&share_token=1TXS8ZMASwuORlh1nOAcSw&mode=embed

Our next step with booksnaps is to explore different technology tools to use. We will try some with flipgrid and chatterpix next.

What is your favorite tool for booksnaps? How do you make booksnaps accessible to your littles?

Coding Unplugged – A number sorting computer

I learned an amazing coding activity at the #NCSTA17 conference in Greensboro, NC in October. The activity is from csunplugged.org. The mat works like a computer. It has rules and paths the information must follow. I was mind blown the first time we did it as adults at the conference and I immediately had the idea to use this as one of my comparing numbers introductions. #math1NBT3

The first time I did this, I taped the pattern out on the floor copying it from the photo I took at the conference. I didn’t want to spend the money making the cloth if it didn’t work. I was worried that my firsties wouldn’t get it since they would need to know right from left in order for the computer to be successful. I was so surprised! They did not want the computer to “break” and were very careful to chose the correct direction and help each other figure out where to go on the coding mat.

I bought this drop cloth at Lowes. I painted the pattern with tempra paint from my classroom. I copied it from the photo I took at the conference. It was pretty easy except I didn’t eyeball the paths correctly and ended up with 2 curved ones when they should all be straight. I also had a few cat prints from my dear sweet 15 year old torti cat, Calypso, being nosy and walking across the mat.

The kids DID NOT MIND! They love hearing all the crazy stories about my pets!

The first time we did this, I gave the kids single digit numbers 1-6 that I knew they would be able to compare and put in order easily. I had them line up out of order at the starting end of the mat. I asked the kids who were not on the computer to tell me what they noticed:

  • “They are 1 digit numbers.”
  • “They are out of order.”

So far so good! I explained the rules and paths on the computer and gave reminders for right and left so the knew which direction to move. At each step forward I had them stop and the observers to notice any changes (Nothing changed except the order of the numbers. And they were still out of order.) I slowed this WAY down. One step at a time asking them to compare and decide: right or left? By the time they go to the other end of the computer they were just as amazed as I was at the conference that this unplugged computer WORKED!!!

The next time we did this, I gave them teen numbers which I knew they were familiar with from kindergarten and had 1 or 2 numbers missing (i.e. 11, 13, 16, 17, 18 19). I kept it at a slow pace. Taking 1 step at a time and comparing and following paths and asking the observers to notice any changes. They were less surprised that the numbers ended up in order and more concerned that some numbers were missing in the order. This led to a great conversation about comparing numbers and the numbers that come between other numbers.

We moved on from there comparing more 2 digit numbers. I gave out another set of cards with 2 digit numbers specifically chosen so that it didn’t matter if they only compared 1 of the digits, it would still work out in order (i.e. 12, 23, 34, 45, 67, 89). I anticipated this would be a common misconception with comparing 2 digit numbers. We talked about always comparing with the tens number firs then the ones if the tens were equal.

The next set of cards had more random 2 digit numbers. I had them draw the base ten picture for this number so they could begin comparing both the number and a picture of that number and visualizing each 2 digit number. The last set of cards had just base ten pictures and they compared the images.

Each time I gave out a new set of cards, I called different students to be in the computer so that everyone could have a chance to observe and notice and participate. Each time we worked the computer, they were able to follow the rules and paths faster. Our observation skills even got keener as they noticed mistakes in the right/left stepping and corrected their friends so we didn’t “break” the computer.

Please share other unplugged computer science or coding activities or ideas you have for this activity in the comments!

Scooters, Science, Goal Setting

Yesterday as I stood in my driveway waiting for AAA to jump start my husband’s car, I watched as the neighbor boy (5 years old) played on his scooter in his driveway. The street leading into our cul-de-sac is a hill and his driveway is also sloped. Our driveways have a little bump so rain water goes down the storm drains instead of flooding our driveways. He went to the top of his driveway and realized he only needed to push once to make it to his garage. Next he went to the bottom of that bump and got frustrated with the number of pushes he needed to make it over the bump before he could coast to the garage. He went a little ways into the cul-de-sac and pushed off. He had to push again to make it over the bump in the driveway and then coast to the garage. He went farther into the cul-de-sac and pushed off. He made it to the peak of the driveway bump but didn’t make it over it. He went to the top of the cul-de-sac as his sister yelled for him to come back inside. This time he made it all the way down to the driveway, up and over the bump, and all the way into his garage. I could tell by the look on his face as he rode faster and faster down the hill that he was so proud of his accomplishment. He knew before he reached the garage that he was successful.

The whole time I watched as he problem solved, tried multiple strategies, failed, made adjustments, but never gave up until he succeeded my teacher brain was going wild!

  1. Wow! I can use this story to teach forces and motion in science to my firsties!
  2. Woah! This kid has some serious growth mindset and was so determined to race to his garage with only one push. He never once gave up or thought he was a terrible scooter rider.
  3. If kids can use these skills when they play why not for academics? Why aren’t academics at school approached through play?
  4. How can I use this kid’s perseverance and apply it to myself?

Yes, I plan to tell this story to my firsties and see if they can apply it to our science unit as well as pull out the character strengths he used while working to solve this problem.

I believe in play based learning as best practice for littles. Kids learn so much from their play. We as teachers need to pull our curriculum objectives out of children’s natural play. We need to guide and inspire play where children can apply curriculum knowledge to their games. Play allows children to feel safe in order to take risks. Risks allow children to learn and grow in deeper ways.

His perseverance inspires me. I am a goal setter but I often don’t make clear plans to take the necessary steps to meet my goals. I need to be more mindful about making plans and following through on the steps I need to take to meet my goals. I also need to take time to reflect on my progress and make adjustments to my plan in order to meet my goal. I need to go farther up the hill to get over the bumps in the path toward my goals.

What does this story make you think about?

#NCSTAlearns #NCSTA17 #NSTA17

I just got back from the North Carolina Science Teachers Association (NCSTA) annual conference and my heart and my mind are full! The links below are to my notes from each session I attended.

I learned to code with out a computer or device. And immediately knew how to bring it back to my students. We’re going to do this exact activity with 2 digit numbers next week as we start our comparing 2 digit number unit (NBT1.3).

I’m a Harry Potter nerd so naturally I went to see a real Madam Trelawney show me the science behind magical creatures, levitation, and potions!

I shared my resources for the new to first grade science unit – Earth in the Universe (E1.1). And while at the Elementary share-a-thon, shared the table with a new friend – Lindsay Rice. We stuck together for the rest of the conference and it was so nice to wander with a familiar face!

We learned that you shouldn’t go to sessions by exhibitors. They’ll want you to buy there stuff. And their stuff is expensive!

I learned about the benefits of graffiti for vocab learning and was inspired to make visual vocabulary displays! (coming soon to my classroom!)

I connected with some other educators after day one of the conference.

I’m inspired by Lindsay to have my students cross their mid-line to improve brain function and make vocabulary fun, engaging, and artistic.

I shared my learning on PBL and technology tools that support inquiry to a group of educators. It was my first time presenting and I’m pleased with how it went, but I have a lot of room for growth! My goal for my first presentation was to get at least 1 participant to join twitter or seesaw and I got 2 for each! Whoot whoot!!

I ended the conference building hinge joints, solving a problem like an astronaut, and attempting to build a balanced mobile (fail). I have to teach that last one soon so I’m going to get some practice in!

I’m grateful for the opportunity to attend this conference and to attend some meaningful sessions. But I’m even more thankful for the connections I made with educators from Union County, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Wilmington, Durham, and the community college network. I’ve heard that the people you meet at conferences are more important than the sessions you attend. This being my first conference on my own. I’m thrilled with the connections I made. Any conferences I attend in the future (alone or in groups) I will 100% form bonds with educators I don’t know!

Thanks to everyone who attended #NCSTAlearns. I’ll see you next year!

#Eclipse2017

Anyone out there still working on their plan for The Great American Eclipse? In my area we have the opportunity to see about 90% of the total eclipse and I am TOTALLY nerding out! North Carolina just rolled out a new science standard for first grade 1.E.1 – Recognize the features and patterns of the earth/moon/sun system as observed from earth. This means #Eclipse2017 fits in my standards!!!! I’m just now getting my details worked out and thought I would share them. Please share yours in the comments section!

Wonder

One of my goals this year is inquiry based instruction. I’m going to begin our day by collecting questions my firsties have about the eclipse. I’m sure they have heard people talking about it and I want to gather what they know and wonders. This may require some last minute scrambling to make sure I address misconceptions and questions I’m not prepared for.

Video

Discovery Education has gathered some great video and image  resources for the eclipse. I’ll start with the one titled “Solar Eclipse.” We’ll watch it once and then I’ll have my firsties write one thing they learned on a sheet of paper. We will use the DE Spotlight on Strategy (SOS) Snowball Fight to review our learning from the video. Students will crumple their paper into a ball, throw it in the middle of the circle and on my cue pull one sheet of paper out and read it. We’ll then watch the video again. After a second video, students will pull 2 snowballs from the circle and add an idea from the video to their friends’ snowballs. We’ll then have some share time to discuss what we noticed from the video. You will probably be able to find a few good videos on You Tube if you don’t have access to Discovery Education.

Article

Reading A-Z has some great science content on Science A-Z. Their July issue has a short 1 page article I’m going to have my firsties read in pairs. After reading, they will use Flipgrid to share a selfie video of the most interesting thing from the article. If you don’t have access to this great resource, they offer a free 2 week trial! Also, Front Row is free and they have a few different short, leveled articles about the eclipse you can share.

Model the eclipse

I have a handful of flashlights and quarters I’m bringing to school tomorrow. Students will use these materials to work in groups of 3-4 to make a video of what they think will happen during the eclipse. They will post this video on Seesaw.

Eclipse Observation

I have this amazing observation sheet from my EDU buddy Bill Ferriter. I have made 5 copies for each student. We will go outside to observe for about 30 seconds. Then we will come inside to work on our observation sheets. We will go out for observation 5 different times during the eclipse so my firsties can see the changes in the sky and environment. Each time we come inside to reflect on observations, we will discuss what we saw and make a prediction of what it will look like next. I’ll have a student share their drawing  and together we will draw our predictions on a portable dry erase board.

Extras!

I just bought a Google Cardboard and they have a Virtual Reality App for the eclipse. It costs $0.99 but I think that is worth it! I only have 1 cardboard so they will have to take turns. I’m doing this before the eclipse will help curb their desire to look at the eclipse outside.


Discovery Education also has a bunch of other videos I can use for my firsties to gather more information. They are also streaming the eclipse live on the Science Channel if it is cloudy or something happens that we can’t go outside. We can also view this when the eclipse is over as we reflect on the experience.

If we have time, we will make this to help us act out the movements of the earth and moon around the sun and try to make it show a solar eclipse.

Mystery Science also has a great activity with all the content you will need!

Reflect

I’m going to use another DE SOS for students to reflect on their experience. I’ll have them recreate the eclipse with art materials then tell about it with the “3 truths and a lie” SOS. I’m going to have them start with 1 truth and 1 lie and add to it time permitting. We’ll write the truths and lies flipbook style so we can hang them in the hall and others can guess which is the truth and which is the lie and flip it up to see.

I also have other reflection ideas so this may change or, better yet, I’ll give them a choice. It’ll depend on how everything goes tomorrow.

  • SOS 6 Word Story
  • Another FlipGrid
  • Chatterpix
  • Seesaw

Note: It is NEVER safe to look directly at the sun! I have parent permission and NASA approved eclipse glasses for each of my firsties. We are going outside to view the eclipse. I will (obviously) be very strict about making sure they know the damage that can be done if they do not leave their glasses on their eyes. I’ve done my research and know that if they look with a naked eye they won’t feel pain because the retina doesn’t have pain receptors and they will have blurry or even lose their vision permanently. I’m going to be very up front and honest with my firsties and I trust them to follow my directions.

PS – I’ll take pictures tomorrow and edit this post after!

#FailForward with paper airplanes

Today was a hectic day. Track 2 tracked out and needed a home base for the day so the track 3 teacher could move into her room. So the track 2 teacher and I decided to #innovate4littles! We planned a paper airplane STEM challenge. It was hard. It was fun. It was dramatic. It was challenging. It was busy. It was engaging. It was amazing. It was innovative!

First, we watched this video. (Don’t judge the weird voices. It was the best we could find on short notice.)

And then we challenged them! We asked them to make a paper airplane that could fly far and not catch on fire. 😜 We showed them a paper airplane book (which a friend called out to identify as a how-to book! 🤗#elaKW2 #innovate4littles)

Then we gave them the rules:

  1. make an airplane
  2. write your name on the airplane
  3. the only material you can use for your airplane is paper (no tape, no glue, no scissors, no paperclips.)

We told them they could use youtube kids to search for how to videos, use the how-to books we had or teach each other if they already knew how to make paper airplanes. The kids immediately broke into their own working groups to build some airplanes. We walked around and called out what we saw for some of the lone roamers to find a group. “Chloe is teaching this group how to fold a paper airplane.” “Ian found a video on youtube kids.” “This group is following the how-to book.”


The room was buzzing with students folding paper. I won’t lie, there were tears. A LOT of tears. Teachers sat down with the stressed out kinders to slow down the steps, model, provide extra hands to stabilize paper being folded, and pause videos at the right moment. Coaching, scaffolding, good teaching.


Then they were ready to test their creations. We went outside to fly them. (We didn’t measure distance this time. That will come soon though!) Kinders teamed up to see who could fly theirs farther than the other. They made sure to start at the same standing spot to be fair. They struggled again because the wind blew the airplanes in crazy directions. (#scieKE1 #ssKG21)

​​​
Finally, we brought them together to debrief. We discussed how it was hard for everyone. Almost every kinder had to use more than one sheet of paper to make a successful airplane. One kinder even used 13 sheets of paper before getting a flying airplane! We talked about how you can learn from something not working. How you change to make it work. How struggle makes your brain grow. How even though it was hard everyone who kept trying made it work. How paper airplanes are like reading, writing, and math. Because mistakes are good, not getting it the first time is good, struggle is good. Then we watched a video on Class Dojo about Growth Mindset. And discussed how it connected to the paper airplanes and learning.

Sometimes you need to take a break from your pacing guide and teach life lessons.

Please share a time when you switched gears and tried something like this with your class.

 

#wakeTLC #PBLitsnothard

#WakeTLC was an amazing opportunity provided to me and other teacher leaders by our district. They were looking for teacher leaders to embark on a self/team guided professional development journey. We were given the agency to choose from Instructional Design, 4Cs, and Project Based Learning (PBL). My group of amazing educators (Kara Damico, Betsy Archer, Rachel Gates, Gloria Butler, Ashlee Wackerly, and Kim Collins) decided to focus on PBL. We entered this journey from all different experiences and background knowledge about PBL. We ranged from not even really understanding what PBL is to others who had dabbled a bit in PBL. Together we dove in to the world of PBL and made a pact to each try one in our classroom before putting together the “deliverable” the district asked us to create.

Because sometimes the universe aligns perfectly, Hacking Project Based Learning was published near the beginning of our work together and it gave us just the jump start we needed to reach a common understanding of PBL and begin planning. After reading the book I was inspired to design a flow chart based on chapter 3. At one of our #wakeTLC sessions we used my flowchart to design a self-guided, differentiated, interactive digital resource for teachers to begin the PBL planning process. Please check it out and leave feedback!

#PBLclouds – the reflection

STOP! This is a reflection post! If you haven’t read the story about what happened during #PBLclouds. Click here to read it now!


My favorite thing about doing a PBL with my weather unit is that my students took ownership over their learning and I only needed to provide them with the time and space to discover. Since this was my first PBL, there are definitely some things that went well and things that totally tanked!


BIE was a great starting point for me. It provided a great outline for my PBL. From there I tweaked some things because their unit was for a first grade class and I’m working with kinders. What I found the most interesting about planning with the BIE resource was a lot of the things I had done in this unit before were in the PBL plan! They were just done a little differently.

I’ve always read Little Cloud by Eric Carle and done a painting activity. The difference was I did it at the end as a culminating art connection. This time I did it as an introduction and launch! The other difference is that before I did the painting ink blot style. Where you dab some paint in the middle of the page and then fold it in half and open it to see what it looks like. This time I let my kinders paint the cloud in the shape they wanted. This changed the perspective. Instead of looking at something that was nothing, my kinders were able to intentionally paint a cloud in the shape they wanted it allowing them to connect to past experiences of seeing clouds.

I’ve also always done the cotton ball clouds activity with my kinders. The difference again is that I used to do it at the end of the unit as a calumniating activity. This time we did it in the middle. I used to have to direct the class in how to manipulate the cotton balls to make them in the shapes of different clouds, this time they worked collaboratively and helped each other problem solve to model different types of clouds. My kinders took what they learned from watching cloud videos and we’re able to stretch and pull the cotton balls apart to make the cloud models. They made models of 6 different types of clouds where in the past I was pulling my hair out to get 4 types!


Both of the above activities were improved through the PBL approach. Allowing children to be intentional and connect their learning to their experiences allows them to see the connection. It was hard, but letting go of the reigns for the cotton ball cloud models and allowing my kinders to problem solve and communicate made it a huge success.

My favorite task I designed for this PBL is the YouTubeKids mission. My kinders have been trying to watch videos on YouTube all year. They know they aren’t supposed to because the content can be inappropriate for school but they do it anyway. They got on in the computer lab, they got on in the classroom on computers and iPads. Rather than fight with them about using it for entertainment, I decided to teach them how to use it for research and and a source of information. Because of content, I decided to use YouTubeKids with them. It blocks much of the inappropriate content. Molly Harnden came to help as extra adult hands with my 6 groups. We talked about what would make a good teaching video and what would be just for fun. We talked about what words to use for a good search. And then they were off. The room was a buzz and it was AHHH_MAAAAZIIIING!!! This went so well that I no longer ban the use of YouTubeKids with my kinders. They know how to use it to find information and are not just watching mindcraft videos!


I was thrilled to get this feedback from a parent after all the hard work we put into learning about the types of clouds and the weather associated with them:

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Isn’t that kind of connection to real life and retention of information what all teachers dream about?

 

At the start of the PBL we took a pre-assessment so my kinders could rank their current knowledge of clouds and weather.

The plan was to do it again at the end and let them compare the 2. We’ll we got into this and busy with that. Before I knew it, it was time to track out! I never did a post assessment! Next PBL I’ll be more careful about wrapping up BEFORE track out! This kind of reflection would have been amazing to observe as my kinders realized how much they learned through discovery.

 

I was really proud of my kinders’ use of the Do Ink Green Screen app to create their weather report videos. But it could have been SOOOO much better! We outlined what meteorologists say, show, and do in their reporting. They discussed with their group what they wanted to say. I SHOULD HAVE had them write down their lines and practiced. We SHOULD HAVE done a few takes of the video and viewed and provided feedback with the whole group prior to publishing. I know I SHOULD HAVE done these things because I got everything from this

​to this:

​Another lesson learned: TV meteorologists are SUPER busy! I didn’t have any luck getting a local news meteorologist to come as an expert visitor. I’m SUPER grateful for a parent contact with the self-employed meteorologist that did come as our expert visitor. I learned something from him! Did you know that meteorologists are important for golf tournaments? Me neither! I also didn’t realize they had specialties like his – predicting lightening. Pretty cool!

Questions or comments about our PBL? comment below!