Book Tasting … YUMMMM!

I’m newly in love with room transformations. I’m a huge supporter of not only flexible seating but having a flexible classroom. If it’s not nailed down, I’ll move it at some point in the year! This experience was my first real dabble in a room transformation. It was fourth quarter and I was ready to try something different. I was getting tired of guided reading and regular reading partners and decided I was going to attempt student led book clubs, modeled after the literature circles I read about in Learn Like a Pirate by Paul Solarz. I’ve seen on Pinterest and Instagram photos of teachers and school librarians turning their spaces into restaurants and having a book tasting to get kids interested in reading different types of books. I decided to use a similar process to introduce the 6 books they would get to choose from for their book clubs.

I bought:

  1. Checkered table cloths
  2. fake flowers from the dollar store
  3. chef hat

Around the school I was able to find vases and a plastic tray. I chose books that were at the benchmark reading level and a little above because that best matched the needs of my students. I used our guided reading book sets from the book room so I knew I would have multiples for each child.

I welcomed students back to the classroom dressed as Head Chef DiOrio. I invited them to taste as many books as they could.

I had students shop around the tables to see the different books I was offering for book clubs. They had to look at covers before they could get their menu to fill out.

I provided each student with a menu to fill out the information about their top 3 book choices.

click image for document
Look at that tongue!

They worked so hard to give me feedback. I played some instrumental cafe music as they did they sneak peeks. I love Vitamin String Quartet for things like this because the music is familiar yet calm. I told students that they needed to give me clear reasons why they wanted certain books. “I like it” or “It is interesting” weren’t enough to convince me.

I hid sealed envelopes with kids’ names on them as a special “reveal” for book clubs.

Inside each envelope was a colored card.

The colored card revealed the book they would read for book clubs.

We spent a week in book clubs reading the books multiple times together and independently with different purposes: characters, setting, problem and solution, lesson learned, and authors purpose (RL1.1, RL1.2, RL1.3, RL1.6 RL1.7, RL1.10). Students responded to their reading in their reading notebooks.

We of course had to celebrate the time spent really getting to know these books!

There’s no better way to do tho that than with food (obviously).

Readers read their favorite parts, shared what they learned, asked and answered questions about the books, and compared and contrasted the stories while we ate (RL1.1, RL1.2, RL1.3, RL1.5, RL1.9).

The conversations were so natural and the students absolutely enjoyed every minute. They were always on topic. It almost felt wrong to use these conversations as an assessment but I learned so much from my readers while they talked. This was the most realistic assessment they may ever have.

This was a memorable experience for both the students and myself and it was tightly tied into the standards I am required to teach in first grade. The photos above are from 2 years ago but I did it again last year and plan to do it again this year! A book tasting is a really light lift when it comes to room transformations. I am really excited to try more and bigger room transformations as I learn more about innovative teaching practices and integrating my curriculum.

Tell me all about your room transformation s and ways you have integrated your curriculum!

2 thoughts on “Book Tasting … YUMMMM!

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